Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir at Theater Image Forum – Shibuya

Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir, a documentary directed by Laurent Bouzereau is opening at Shibuya’s Theatre Image Forum from 6/1 – 7/12th, 2013. Rosemary’s Baby, A Knife in the Water, Repulsion and Cul-de-Sac directed by Roman Polanski will also be screening at the theatre. Great opportunity to watch a documentary about the controversial Polish-French director and revisit some of his acclaimed films shown in new print and digital remasters. (Distributed by Kadokawa Pictures and Mermaid Films)

Roman Polanski A Film Memoir 2-Lr

ROMAN POLANSKI:A FILM MEMOIR 2012 – (94 minutes) Digital/Vista/English with Japanese subtitles – A documentary about Roman Polanski, the man and filmmaker. Roman Polanski speaks about his eventful life story and career in conversation with Andrew Braunsberg, his former business partner, producer, and friend of many years.

Roman Polanski A Film Memoir-Lr

The documentary ROMAN POLANSKI: A FILM MEMOIR tells the extraordinary story of Roman Polanski’s life, beginning with his childhood in the Cracow ghetto, his first films in Poland, the move to Paris, his career in Europe and America, crowned with an Oscar for THE PIANIST, the tragedy of the murder of his pregnant wife Sharon Tate in Los Angeles, the controversy surrounding his arrest in 1977, through to his work and life today in France with his wife Emmanuelle Seigner. The conversations were recorded during Roman Polanski‘s stay in his home in Gstaad where he was under house arrest for several months after he was apprehended on his way to the Zurich Film Festival in 2009. The conversations are illustrated with excerpts from Polanski’s films, news footage, press clippings, private and exclusive photos, and documents chronicling the filmmaker’s extraordinary life.

Screening Schedule for Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir
6/1 – 6/7: 11:15 and 16:00
6/8 – 6/14: 13:45
6/15 – 6/21: 11:15 and 16:00
6/22 – 6/28: 19:00
6/29 – 7/5: 13:45 and 19:00
7/6 – 7/12: 11:15
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

ROSEMARY’S BABY (137 minutes) 1968 – 35mm New Print/Color/English with Japanese subtitle – Starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon and Sidney Blackmer.

Rosemary's Baby 2-Lr

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) is Polish director Roman Polanski’s first American feature film and his second, scary horror film – following his first film in English titled Repulsion (1965). The eerie gothic film is about a young newlywed couple who move into a large, rambling old apartment building in Central Park West, and begin a loving, post-honeymoon period. Mia Farrow as a young mother-to-be who grows increasingly suspicious that her overfriendly elderly neighbors (played by Sidney Blackmer and an Oscar-winning Ruth Gordon) and self-involved husband (John Cassavetes) are hatching a satanic plot against her and her baby.

Rosemary's Baby-Lr-2

Polanski gives the audience a great deal of information early in the story, and by the time the movie’s halfway over we’re pretty sure what’s going on in that apartment next door. When the conclusion comes, it works not because it is a surprise but because it is horrifyingly inevitable. Rosemary makes her dreadful discovery, and we are wrenched because we knew what was going to happen—and couldn’t help her. This is why the movie is so good. The characters and the story transcend the plot. In most horror films, and indeed in most suspense films of the Alfred Hitchcock tradition, the characters are at the mercy of the plot. In this one, they emerge as human beings actually doing these things.

Rosemary's Baby-Lr

Screening Schedule for Rosemary’s Baby
6/1 -6/7: 13:15 and 19:00
6/8 – 6/14: 11:15 and 19:00
6/15 – 6/21: 13:15
6/22 – 6/28: 16:00
6/29 – 7/5: 11:15 and 16:00
7/6th – 7/12: 13:15
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

KNIFE IN THE WATER (94 minutes) 1962 – Digital/B&W/Polish with Japanese subtitle – Starring Leon Niemczyk, Jolanta Umecka and Zygmunt Malanowicz.

A Knife in the Water.Tumblr-Lr

Knife in the Water is set on a boat (Part of the “water trilogy” alongside Cul-de-sac), it is claustrophobic and personal as we join a married couple on a boat trip. Suffice to say, this is disrupted as a lone student hitchhiker joins them. The tension gradually builds between Andrzej, the husband and the unnamed hitchhiker as they vie for the attentions of the young wife. A fight ensues between Andrzej and the hitchhiker and the latter falls into the water.

A Knife in the Water 2-Lr

With stinging dialogue and a mercilessly probing camera, Polanski creates a disturbing study of fear, humiliation, sexuality, and aggression. This remarkable directorial debut won Polanski worldwide acclaim, a place on the cover of Time, and his first Oscar nomination. Polanski manages to map out many of the tropes that will become trademarks to his style. On reflection, the very definition of auteur is established here in Polanski’s work. The sexual tension as the lone female character wanders around in a bikini and dressing gown will spill into his films. The aforementioned use of water and subtle creaking sound-effects all appear in a different manner throughout his career.

Screening Schedule for Knife in the Water
6/8 – 6/14: 16:00
7/6 – 7/12: 19:00
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

REPULSION (105 minutes) 1965 – Digital/B&W/English with Japanese subtitle – Starring Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry, John Fraser and Yvonne Furneaux.

Repulsionr 3-Lr

The first of Polanski’s ‘Apartment’ trilogy (preceding Rosemary’s Baby and The Tenant), Repulsion ensured Polanski would be taken more seriously across continents as the film was his first English-language feature, and the fact that it made a “healthy box office”secured financing for his next film, Cul-de-sac.

Repulsionr 2-Lr

Repulsion tracks the slow, mounting madness in Carol (Catherine Deneuve), a single beautician who shares a flat with her sister Helen (Yvonne Furneaux). From the outset, she is clearly an outcast – often staring into space, losing track of her surroundings and becoming increasingly uncomfortable with the advances of Colin (John Fraser) and the confident sexuality of her sister’s married lover Michael (Ian Hendry). Helen and Michael decide to go on holiday to Italy, leaving Carol on her own – whereby her madness begins to take over her life. Repulsion truly is a milestone in Polanski’s career – and as only the second film in his canon, you cannot help but be astonished at how confident he is in exploring such multi-layered events within such a small space and context.

Repulsion-Lr

Screening Schedule for Repulsion
6/15 – 6/21: 19:00
6/22 – 6/28: 11:15
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

CUL-DE-SAC (102 minutes) 1966- Digital/B&W/English with Japanese subtitle – Starring Françoise Dorléac, Donald Pleasence, Lionel Stander and Jack MacGowran

Cul-de-Sac-Lr

The script of Cul-de-Sac was written in 1963 and has remained Roman Polański’s favourite of his films. It was not, however, until the success of his first foreign film Repulsion (1965), which won the Silver Bear at the 1965 Berlin Film Festival, that Polański’s status as international auteur was confirmed, and the long-cherished Cul-de-Sac was green lit. Both Repulsion and Cul-de-Sac were made by the London-based Compton Group at a time when the city welcomed art film as a counterpart to Hollywood, and became something of a Mecca for arthouse directors.

Cul-de Sac 2-Lr

Lindisfarne, Holy Island: two gangsters named Dickie and Albie are on the run after a botched job. Dickie leaves the wounded Albie in the car and goes to look for help, stumbling upon a castle. Inside he finds George, who is dressed as a woman, and his young wife, Teresa. He terrorizes both man and wife, and orders them to help him bring Albie from the car. George is strangely ineffectual in defending his home and soon it turns out that Teresa is unfaithful to him. Dickie phones the mysterious Katelbach, who says that they are on their own, which is bad news for Albie. Following the arrival of some English friends of George and Teresa, and Dickie’s pretending to be their butler, events soon take a turn for the worse.

Cul-de Sac 3-Lr

In Cul-de-Sac, George is an exile of sorts who has left his bourgeois life with his previous wife and relocated to Lindisfarne Island. The denationalized space of the beach in Cul-de-Sac is significant in evoking a transnational affinity to other art film directors of that time, who privilege this location for the exploration of la condition humaine: Bergman’s Det sjunde inseglet/The Seventh Seal (1957), Såsom i en spegel/Through a Glass Darkly (1961) and Persona (1966); Truffaut’s Les Quatre Cents Coups/The 400 Blows (1959) or Fellini’s La Dolce Vita (1960).

Screening Schedule for Cul-de-Sac
6/22 – 6/28: 13:15
7/6 – 7/12: 16:00
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir Official Web Site http://mermaidfilms.co.jp/rp/

Shibuya’s Theatre Image Forum Official Web Site http://www.imageforum.co.jp/theatre/index.html

Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir, a documentary directed by Laurent Bouzereau is opening at Shibuya’s Theatre Image Forum from 6/1 – 7/12th, 2013. Rosemary’s Baby, A Knife in the Water, Repulsion and Cul-de-Sac directed by Roman Polanski will also be screening at the theatre. Great opportunity to watch a documentary about the controversial Polish-French director and revisit some of his acclaimed films shown in new print and digital remasters. (Distributed by Kadokawa Pictures and Mermaid Films)

Roman Polanski A Film Memoir 2-Lr

ROMAN POLANSKI:A FILM MEMOIR 2012 – (94 minutes) Digital/Vista/English with Japanese subtitles – A documentary about Roman Polanski, the man and filmmaker. Roman Polanski speaks about his eventful life story and career in conversation with Andrew Braunsberg, his former business partner, producer, and friend of many years.

Roman Polanski A Film Memoir-Lr

The documentary ROMAN POLANSKI: A FILM MEMOIR tells the extraordinary story of Roman Polanski’s life, beginning with his childhood in the Cracow ghetto, his first films in Poland, the move to Paris, his career in Europe and America, crowned with an Oscar for THE PIANIST, the tragedy of the murder of his pregnant wife Sharon Tate in Los Angeles, the controversy surrounding his arrest in 1977, through to his work and life today in France with his wife Emmanuelle Seigner. The conversations were recorded during Roman Polanski‘s stay in his home in Gstaad where he was under house arrest for several months after he was apprehended on his way to the Zurich Film Festival in 2009. The conversations are illustrated with excerpts from Polanski’s films, news footage, press clippings, private and exclusive photos, and documents chronicling the filmmaker’s extraordinary life.

Screening Schedule for Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir
6/1 – 6/7: 11:15 and 16:00
6/8 – 6/14: 13:45
6/15 – 6/21: 11:15 and 16:00
6/22 – 6/28: 19:00
6/29 – 7/5: 13:45 and 19:00
7/6 – 7/12: 11:15
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

ROSEMARY’S BABY (137 minutes) 1968 – 35mm New Print/Color/English with Japanese subtitle – Starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon and Sidney Blackmer.

Rosemary's Baby 2-Lr

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) is Polish director Roman Polanski’s first American feature film and his second, scary horror film – following his first film in English titled Repulsion (1965). The eerie gothic film is about a young newlywed couple who move into a large, rambling old apartment building in Central Park West, and begin a loving, post-honeymoon period. Mia Farrow as a young mother-to-be who grows increasingly suspicious that her overfriendly elderly neighbors (played by Sidney Blackmer and an Oscar-winning Ruth Gordon) and self-involved husband (John Cassavetes) are hatching a satanic plot against her and her baby.

Rosemary's Baby-Lr-2

Polanski gives the audience a great deal of information early in the story, and by the time the movie’s halfway over we’re pretty sure what’s going on in that apartment next door. When the conclusion comes, it works not because it is a surprise but because it is horrifyingly inevitable. Rosemary makes her dreadful discovery, and we are wrenched because we knew what was going to happen—and couldn’t help her. This is why the movie is so good. The characters and the story transcend the plot. In most horror films, and indeed in most suspense films of the Alfred Hitchcock tradition, the characters are at the mercy of the plot. In this one, they emerge as human beings actually doing these things.

Rosemary's Baby-Lr

Screening Schedule for Rosemary’s Baby
6/1 -6/7: 13:15 and 19:00
6/8 – 6/14: 11:15 and 19:00
6/15 – 6/21: 13:15
6/22 – 6/28: 16:00
6/29 – 7/5: 11:15 and 16:00
7/6th – 7/12: 13:15
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

KNIFE IN THE WATER (94 minutes) 1962 – Digital/B&W/Polish with Japanese subtitle – Starring Leon Niemczyk, Jolanta Umecka and Zygmunt Malanowicz.

A Knife in the Water.Tumblr-Lr

Knife in the Water is set on a boat (Part of the “water trilogy” alongside Cul-de-sac), it is claustrophobic and personal as we join a married couple on a boat trip. Suffice to say, this is disrupted as a lone student hitchhiker joins them. The tension gradually builds between Andrzej, the husband and the unnamed hitchhiker as they vie for the attentions of the young wife. A fight ensues between Andrzej and the hitchhiker and the latter falls into the water.

A Knife in the Water 2-Lr

With stinging dialogue and a mercilessly probing camera, Polanski creates a disturbing study of fear, humiliation, sexuality, and aggression. This remarkable directorial debut won Polanski worldwide acclaim, a place on the cover of Time, and his first Oscar nomination. Polanski manages to map out many of the tropes that will become trademarks to his style. On reflection, the very definition of auteur is established here in Polanski’s work. The sexual tension as the lone female character wanders around in a bikini and dressing gown will spill into his films. The aforementioned use of water and subtle creaking sound-effects all appear in a different manner throughout his career.

Screening Schedule for Knife in the Water
6/8 – 6/14: 16:00
7/6 – 7/12: 19:00
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

REPULSION (105 minutes) 1965 – Digital/B&W/English with Japanese subtitle – Starring Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry, John Fraser and Yvonne Furneaux.

Repulsionr 3-Lr

The first of Polanski’s ‘Apartment’ trilogy (preceding Rosemary’s Baby and The Tenant), Repulsion ensured Polanski would be taken more seriously across continents as the film was his first English-language feature, and the fact that it made a “healthy box office”secured financing for his next film, Cul-de-sac.

Repulsionr 2-Lr

Repulsion tracks the slow, mounting madness in Carol (Catherine Deneuve), a single beautician who shares a flat with her sister Helen (Yvonne Furneaux). From the outset, she is clearly an outcast – often staring into space, losing track of her surroundings and becoming increasingly uncomfortable with the advances of Colin (John Fraser) and the confident sexuality of her sister’s married lover Michael (Ian Hendry). Helen and Michael decide to go on holiday to Italy, leaving Carol on her own – whereby her madness begins to take over her life. Repulsion truly is a milestone in Polanski’s career – and as only the second film in his canon, you cannot help but be astonished at how confident he is in exploring such multi-layered events within such a small space and context.

Repulsion-Lr

Screening Schedule for Repulsion
6/15 – 6/21: 19:00
6/22 – 6/28: 11:15
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

CUL-DE-SAC (102 minutes) 1966- Digital/B&W/English with Japanese subtitle – Starring Françoise Dorléac, Donald Pleasence, Lionel Stander and Jack MacGowran

Cul-de-Sac-Lr

The script of Cul-de-Sac was written in 1963 and has remained Roman Polański’s favourite of his films. It was not, however, until the success of his first foreign film Repulsion (1965), which won the Silver Bear at the 1965 Berlin Film Festival, that Polański’s status as international auteur was confirmed, and the long-cherished Cul-de-Sac was green lit. Both Repulsion and Cul-de-Sac were made by the London-based Compton Group at a time when the city welcomed art film as a counterpart to Hollywood, and became something of a Mecca for arthouse directors.

Cul-de Sac 2-Lr

Lindisfarne, Holy Island: two gangsters named Dickie and Albie are on the run after a botched job. Dickie leaves the wounded Albie in the car and goes to look for help, stumbling upon a castle. Inside he finds George, who is dressed as a woman, and his young wife, Teresa. He terrorizes both man and wife, and orders them to help him bring Albie from the car. George is strangely ineffectual in defending his home and soon it turns out that Teresa is unfaithful to him. Dickie phones the mysterious Katelbach, who says that they are on their own, which is bad news for Albie. Following the arrival of some English friends of George and Teresa, and Dickie’s pretending to be their butler, events soon take a turn for the worse.

Cul-de Sac 3-Lr

In Cul-de-Sac, George is an exile of sorts who has left his bourgeois life with his previous wife and relocated to Lindisfarne Island. The denationalized space of the beach in Cul-de-Sac is significant in evoking a transnational affinity to other art film directors of that time, who privilege this location for the exploration of la condition humaine: Bergman’s Det sjunde inseglet/The Seventh Seal (1957), Såsom i en spegel/Through a Glass Darkly (1961) and Persona (1966); Truffaut’s Les Quatre Cents Coups/The 400 Blows (1959) or Fellini’s La Dolce Vita (1960).

Screening Schedule for Cul-de-Sac
6/22 – 6/28: 13:15
7/6 – 7/12: 16:00
*Please double check the screening schedules and find the ticket price and theater location at the official site.

Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir Official Web Site http://mermaidfilms.co.jp/rp/

Shibuya’s Theatre Image Forum Official Web Site http://www.imageforum.co.jp/theatre/index.html

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2015カンヌ映画祭:マッテオ・ガッローネの『Tale of Tales』レビュー

the-tale-of-tales-official 1

白塗りの部屋の大テーブルの中央に腰掛けるサルマ・ハエックは食欲旺盛に鼓動を打つ大きな心臓を食す。これはマッテオ・ガッローネの映画『Tale of Tales』の場面写真でカンヌ映画祭でのワールド・プレミアに至るまで、ソーシャルメディアを行き来したものだ。ハエックの食事のシーンはコンペティション部門にエントリーを果たしたイタリア人監督の空想に満ちた三つのおとぎ話を描いた構成のターニング・ポイントになっている。

17世紀ナポリの著者ジャンバティスタ・バジーレの物語から脚色された『Tale of Tales』はヴァンサン·カッセル、サルマ·ハエック、トビー·ジョーンズ、そしてジョン·C·ライリーが演じる三つの王族の語となる、母親になろうと固く決意する女王、女の尻を追い回すことがやめられない性欲に飢えた王、そして娘を犠牲にしても蚤に執着する老いた君主を織り交ぜている。

matteo Garrone 3

「作家が一般的に知られていないのは理不尽だと思っている」とガッローネはカンヌでの『Tale of Tales』の記者会見でバジーレを語る。1556年にナポリで誕生したバジーレは子供を楽しませることを目的におとぎ話を書き、後にハンス・クリスチャン・アンデルセンやグリム兄弟に影響を与える。

「映画の重要な発想は欲望、限界を超えて妄想へと変わる欲望だ」とガッローネは付け加える。

バジーレの物語に魅力を感じたのはその普遍性と自らの登場人物に対する情熱だったと説明するガッローネ。46歳の監督は『剥製師』(02)、『ゴモラ』(08)、『リアリティ』(12)は互いに異なるように見えるが、登場人物の好みという意味では共通すると認めている。

明るく、色鮮やかな登場人物や背景で満ちている『Tale of Tales』には一部の視聴者に衝撃を与える場面もある。「私たちは、映画の原点に戻り、観客を驚かせることになるイメージの創造を試みた」とガッローネは語る。

Tale of Tales 4

『Tale of Tales』は細心の注意を払い用意した手作りセット、小道具や豪華な時代物のコスチュームがふんだんに使われている。ハエックが海の怪物の心臓を貪る、子の授かりを妨げる呪縛から彼女を解放させる為の行為だが、そのシーンは実に気色悪い体験である事は驚くべきことではない。

「監督は心臓のシーンを完璧に撮りたかった。私が一口それをかじれば血管がなくなったのが分かるくらいに」とハエックは声を上げる。

ガッローネはパスタやキャンディを使い解剖学的に正確な臓器を作り上げた。ハエックが心臓を貪り食うクローズアップは吐き気を催す時は吐き出せるようにカメラのフレームを調整した。『Tale of Tales』の登場人物の妄想を語る監督だが、その特徴は登場人物から監督へとうつっているようだ。

「メソッド演技法を行う俳優がいるようにメソッド・ディレクターもいる」と記者会見の場で語るハエック「監督は到着すると直ぐに自らの世界に没頭する。その世界にそぐわない事が起こると解決するまで追求する」

Tales 5

ガッローネは自ら努力し反映させた、生きいきとした映画の究極のおとぎ話の中で楽しんでいるようだ。

「確かに誰もが理解する事のできる登場人物ではあるが物語は思いもしない方向へと進んでいく。とても特有な方法でたぐいまれな場所へといざなう」と監督は述べた。

(Film Comment 訳)

Pawel Pawlikowski’s IDA at Theater Image Forum – Shibuya

ida-j-release_00(1)

From acclaimed director Pawel Pawlikowski (Last Resort, My Summer of Love) comes Ida, a moving and intimate drama about a young novitiate nun in 1960s Poland who, on the verge of taking her vows, makes a shocking discovery about her past. 

IDA will begin playing at Image Forum Theater at Shibuya from August 2, 2014.

Director: Pawel Pawlikowski
Writer: Pawel Pawlikowski, Rebecca Lenkiewicz
Cinematography: Ryszard Lenczewski, Lukasz Zal

Cast
Agata Trzebuchowska as Anna
Agata Kulesza as Wanda
Joanna Kulig as Singer
Dawid Ogrodnik as Musician
Adam Szyszkowski as Feliks Skiba
Jerzy Trela as Szymon Skiba
Artur Janusiak as Militia Man

Production
(Poland) An Opus Film, Phoenix Film production in association with Portobello Pictures in coproduction with Canal Plus Poland, Phoenix Film Poland. (International sales: Fandango Portobello, Copenhagen.) Produced by Eric Abraham, Piotr Dzieciol, Ewa Puszczynska. Coproducer, Christian Falkenberg Husum.

Crew
Editor, Jaroslaw Kaminski; production designers, Katarzyna Sobanska, Marcel Slawinski; costume designer, Aleksandra Staszko; Kristian Selin Eidnes Andersen; supervising sound editor, Claus Lynge; re-recording mixers, Lynge, Andreas Kongsgaard; visual effects, Stage 2; line producer, Magdalena Malisz; associate producer, Sofie Wanting Hassing.

hero_Ida-2014-(2)

IDA Roger Ebert.com
May 2, 2014 Godfrey Cheshire

Debuted earlier this year at Lincoln Center and now on a national tour, the 21-film series “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” bears stunning testament to the brilliance of not only one especially fecund national cinema but an entire era of moviemaking—call it the golden age of the art film. As Martin Scorsese, who curated the series and whose Film Foundation provided its pristine digital restorations, has remarked, the period it covers (roughly the ‘50s through the ‘70s) was one of extraordinary accomplishments in many parts of the cinematic world, a high-water mark that grows ever more dazzling in retrospect.

Set in the Poland of 1962 and composed of austerely gorgeous black and white images, Pawel Pawlikowski’s “Ida” could fit right into the “Masterpieces” series, evoking as it does films ranging from Andrzej Wajda’s “Innocent Sorcerers” to Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s “Mother Joan of the Angels” (both 1960). But that’s not to suggest it’s a throwback or an exercise in cinematic nostalgia. Riveting, original and breathtakingly accomplished on every level, “Ida” would be a masterpiece in any era, in any country.

Somewhat ironically, director and co-writer Pawlikowski can’t be considered a Polish filmmaker in any strict sense. Though born in Poland, he grew up in Great Britain and has done most of his work there (his previous films include “My Summer of Love” and “Last Resort”). “Ida” represents a return home for the filmmaker, one that he has said draws on the memories, sights and sounds of his childhood.

That retrospective, and somewhat impressionistic, viewpoint mirrors the film’s own. Though set in the ’60s, the era of Communist rule and modernization, the story scripted by Pawlikowski and Rebecca Lenkiewicz looks backward in time. Given that it starts out in a convent that seems like it hasn’t changed since the Middle Ages, you might say that the film’s perspective suggests a vast expanse of Polish history. But its main focus is closer to hand: the country’s occupation by the Nazis (a historical passage that is resonantly evoked but never seen or directly referred to).

Anna (Agata Trzebokowska) is an 18-year-old orphan who was raised in that convent and is preparing to take her vows when her Mother Superior insists that first she meet her one known relative. That is an aunt, Wanda (Agneta Kulesza), a former prosecutor with a high Communist Party rank whose dissolute life of smoking, drinking and bedding men stands in stark contrast to the ascetic existence of her sheltered niece. But Anna has more to be shocked about when Wanda tells her that her real name is Ida (pronounced Eeda), that she is Jewish and that her parents were killed during World War II.

This revelation triggers a journey in which aunt and niece drive back to the village of Anna’s parents in an effort to discover how they died and where they were buried. Although this quest is central to the narrative, “Ida” is anything but plot-driven. It’s a film of moments, observations and moods, with a lyrical unfolding that recalls such atmospheric monochrome road movies as Wim Wenders’ “Kings of the Road.” And when the two voyagers pick up a hitchhiking tenor saxophonist (Dawid Ogrodnik) and end up watching his gigs, the music of John Coltrane and similar artists adds an engrossing aural dimension to the odyssey.

Few recent films can claim a visual approach as striking as that which cinematographers Lukasz Zal and Ryszard Lenczewski give “Ida.” Filmed in the unusual, boxy aspect ratio of 1.37:1, and most often deployed in static long shots, the film’s images sometimes suggest Vermeer lighting with the color taken away, and the compositions manage to seem at once classical and off-handed, with the subjects often located in the screen’s two bottom quadrants. As in Bresson, the effect is to draw the viewer’s eye into the beauty of the image while simultaneously maintaining a contemplative distance from the drama.

Pawlikoski and Lenkiewicz’s scripting proves similarly lapidarian. Besides its look, “Ida” most recalls the manner of bygone art films in the modernist spareness and thoroughgoing obliqueness of its writing. Very little is stated directly; instead, we glean things from casual remarks and subtle suggestions. Somehow, this technique of inference makes the film’s eventual revelations feel both more integral and more powerful.

Because revelations do come, despite the quest’s languorous rhythms, and they touch on arguably the darkest and most troubling chapter in modern Poland’s history. What happened to Anna’s parents? Most films that approach this horrific arena envision jackbooted armies and vast industrial execution sites. But in Poland in the ’40s, as in Cambodia in the ’70s and Rwanda in the ’90s, evil’s authors could be one’s friends and neighbors, and simple farm implements its instruments. In touching on this reality, “Ida” adds something to a subject that sometimes seems to have lost the ability to disturb us as it should in movies.

Besides this historical acuity, the film gives us a fascinating pair of matched archetypes in its main characters, which are realized in two exquisite performances. As the aspiring nun who’s suddenly tossed into the ugliness of the world, newcomer Agata Trzebokowska proves a poised icon of luminous quietude and awakened curiosity, discovering herself as she painfully uncovers her past. And as the embittered, nihilistic “Red Wanda,” a woman driven both by the horrors inflicted on her and those she’s inflicted on others, veteran Polish actress Agneta Kulesza creates the astonishing impression that some of history’s most wrenching conflicts are being played out in a single human soul. Like much about “Ida,” these actresses’ work not only pays homage to masterpieces of the past but revivifies current cinema in doing so.

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The New York Times
May 1, 2014 A. O. Scott
An Innocent Awakened
‘Ida,’ About an Excavation of Truth in Postwar Poland

Though it takes place in Poland in 1962 — a weary, disenchanted country grinding along under gray, post-Stalinist skies — Pawel Pawlikowski’s “Ida” has some of the structure and feeling of an ancient folk tale. It concerns an orphan who must make her way through a haunted, threatening landscape, protected only by her own good sense and a powerful, not entirely trustworthy companion.

Ida (Agata Trzebuchowska) is a young novice a few days from taking her vows in the convent that has been her only home since infancy when she learns of the existence of a previously unknown aunt named Wanda (Agata Kulesza). If this were actually a fairy tale, Wanda might be both fairy godmother and wicked witch. A former state prosecutor, she boasts grimly of her role in the political show trials of the early 1950s, when Poland’s Communist government used judicial terror (among other methods) to consolidate its power and eliminate its enemies.

A decade later, she is still part of the political elite, though whatever zealotry she might once have had has long since been replaced by cynicism. Chain-smoking and drinking heavily, pursuing one-night stands more out of habit than desire, she is in every way the opposite of her unworldly, pious niece. But Wanda does see a family resemblance and also has a startling piece of news, delivered with a wry, bitter smile as Ida, with her coif and crucifix, sits at the kitchen table: “You’re Jewish.”

This is not a joke — and there is nothing funny about the wartime fate of Poland’s Jews, including Ida’s parents — but “Ida” and its characters are alert to the absurdities of Polish history, as well as its abundant horrors. Mr. Pawlikowski, a Polish-born writer and director who has spent most of his career in England, has reached into his country’s past and grabbed hold of a handful of nettles. “Ida” is a breathtakingly concise film — just 80 minutes long — with a clear, simple narrative line. But within its relatively brief duration and its narrow black-and-white frames, the movie somehow contains a cosmos of guilt, violence and pain. Its intimate drama unfolds at the crossroads where the Catholic, Jewish and Communist strains of Poland’s endlessly and bitterly contested national identity intersect.

Ida and Wanda set out to discover what happened to Ida’s parents, a quest that turns “Ida” into both a road movie and a detective story. They encounter priests and peasants, provincial officials and a saxophonist (Dawid Ogrodnik) whose advanced musical taste (as well as his attraction to Ida, in spite of her habit) provides a hint of youthful ’60s spirit amid the gloom and bad memories.

Mr. Pawlikowski, who started out making documentaries and whose previous fictional features include “Last Resort,” “My Summer of Love” and “The Woman in the Fifth,” can be a wonderfully lucid storyteller. “Ida” is as compact and precise as a novella, a sequence of short, emphatic scenes that reveal the essence of the characters without simplifying them. Having set up an obvious contrast between Wanda and Ida — atheist and believer; woman of the world and sheltered child; sensualist and saint — the film proceeds to complicate each woman’s idea of herself and the other. Their black-and-white conceptions of the world turn grayer by the hour.

This is almost literally true, thanks to Lukasz Zal and Ryszard Lenczewski’s beautifully misty, piercingly sharp monochrome cinematography. The look of “Ida” — images captured by a mostly stationary camera in the boxy frame associated with old movies — serves an obvious period function. What you are watching could virtually have been made in 1962. (The Polish countryside seems to have cooperated by not changing too much in the decades since.) Until the very end, the audience never hears music unless the people on screen hear it, too, and many of the scenes — at once austere and charged with an intensity that verges on the metaphysical — owe an evident debt to ’60s cinema heroes like Ingmar Bergman and Robert Bresson.

But “Ida” is hardly an exercise in antiquarian pastiche. It is rather an excavation of truths that remain, 70 years after the Holocaust and a quarter-century after the collapse of Communism, only partially disinterred. And it is, above all, about the spiritual and moral condition of the women, who, between them, occupy nearly every second of this film.

Mr. Pawlikowski’s style of shooting might be described as sympathetically objective. His camera maintains its distance, and he never presumes access to the inner lives of his characters. He keeps them low in the frame, with unusually ample space above their heads, creating a kind of cathedral effect. Ida and Wanda can seem small and alone, lost in a vast and empty universe. But their surroundings often achieve a quiet grandeur, an intimation of divine presence.

There is an implicit argument here between faith and materialism, one that is resolved with wit, conviction and generosity of spirit. Mr. Pawlikowski has made one of the finest European films (and one of most insightful films about Europe, past and present) in recent memory.

ut the accomplishment is hardly his alone: “Ida” belongs equally — and on the screen, pre-eminently — to the two Agatas. Ms. Kulesza is a poised and disciplined professional, able to show us both Wanda’s ruthless self-control and its limits. Ms. Trzebuchowska, a student with little previous acting experience, is a natural screen presence and also an enigmatic one. Ida starts out, for the audience and perhaps herself, as an empty vessel, with little knowledge or experience of the world. To watch her respond to it is to perceive the activation of intelligence and the awakening of wisdom. I can’t imagine anything more thrilling.

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THE NEW YORKER
May 27, 2014 David Denby
“IDA”: A FILM MASTERPIECE

We are so used to constant movement and compulsive cutting in American movies that the stillness of the great new Polish film “Ida” comes as something of a shock. I can’t recall a movie that makes such expressive use of silence and portraiture; from the beginning, I was thrown into a state of awe by the movie’s fervent austerity. Friends have reported similar reactions: if not awe, then at least extreme concentration and satisfaction. This compact masterpiece has the curt definition and the finality of a reckoning—a reckoning in which anger and mourning blend together. The director, Pawel Pawlikowski, left Poland years ago, for England, where he linked up with the English-born playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz. After making documentaries for British television, Pawlikowski began directing features in English, including “My Summer of Love” (2004), with Emily Blunt, then unknown, and “The Woman in the Fifth” (2012), with Ethan Hawke and Kristin Scott Thomas. “Ida” is a charged, bitter return. Set in 1961, during the Stalinist dictatorship, the movie pushes still further into the past; almost every element in the story evokes the war years and their aftermath. The filmmakers have confronted a birthplace never forgiven but also never abandoned.

In a majestic convent, an orphaned young woman—a novice named Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska)—is ordered by her Mother Superior to visit her aunt in Lodz before she takes orders. A beautiful eighteen-year-old with a broad Slavic face, a composed, devotional manner, and a tantalizing dimple, the girl has never left the convent before and knows nothing of her family. In Lodz, wearing her habit, Anna enters the apartment of a forty-five-ish woman, who is puffing on a cigarette and waiting for the guy she picked up the night before to leave. A minor state judge and Communist Party member, Wanda Gruz (Agata Kulesza) tells her niece that her real name is Ida Lebenstein, and that she’s Jewish—a “Jewish nun,” she says. Abrupt and dismissive, Wanda enjoys attacking the girl’s ignorance. But Wanda has mysteries of her own and scores to settle: Ida’s mother was her beloved sister. The two agree to go to the village in which the parents were hidden by Christians and then betrayed—the village where Wanda grew up.

“Ida” becomes both an investigation of sorts and an intermittent road movie, featuring a dialectically opposed odd couple—Catholic and Communist, innocent girl and hard-living political intellectual, lover (of Christ) and hater (of the Polish past). Yet neither is a type, and what happens to each has to be understood as both an individual’s fate and a Polish fate. Ida’s faith and disciplined simplicity will be jostled by experience, and Wanda will be tested, too, as her own buried sorrows come back to life. Sardonic comedy lurks within the strange pairing. At first, Wanda can’t stop taunting Ida’s indifference to sex, and, about the village, she says, “What if you go there and discover that there is no God?” Yet Pawlikowski doesn’t favor one point of view over the other: the two women are equal in their isolation and their need to pull together the shards of identity in a country that has been almost entirely broken.

Between 1939 and 1945, Poland lost a fifth of its population, including three million Jews. In the two years after the war, Communists took over the government under the eyes of the Red Army and the Soviet secret police, the N.K.V.D. Many Poles who were prominent in resisting the Nazis were accused of preposterous crimes; the independent-minded were shot or hanged. In the movie, none of this is stated, but all of it is built, so to speak, into the atmosphere: the country feels dead, the population sparse, the mood of ordinary conversations constrained by the sure knowledge that many who survived have committed acts of betrayal or indulged willful ignorance.

How can you capture a nation’s spirit by telling a singular story? By making every shot as definitive as an icon. “I’m not emotionally excited by the power of cinema’s tricks anymore,” Pawlikowski has said. The director and his fledgling cinematographer, Lukasz Zal, shot the movie in hard-focus black and white; they have produced images so distinct and powerful that they sharpen our senses. “Ida” might be called static were it not for the currents of emotion from shot to shot, which electrify the women’s relation to each other throughout. Clearing away clutter, Pawlikowski almost never moves the camera; many of the scenes are just long-lasting shots, fed by a single light source that often puts the faces in partial shadow (what we understand of these two women will always be limited). Sometimes the figures are positioned at the bottom of the frame, with enormous gray Polish skies above them, as if the entire burden of a cursed country weighed on its people. Both beautiful and oppressive, the bleakness of the landscape in winter suggests something uncanny in the air, as if we were watching a horror film without ghouls.

One can trace possible influences—Carl Theodor Dreyer, very likely, and Robert Bresson, and European art films from the sixties and early seventies like François Truffaut’s “The Wild Child,” and also Polish movies made in the period in which “Ida” is set. But I can’t recall anything major that looks quite like this movie. Pawlikowski is not after commonplace realism but something you would have to call minimal realism, in which the paring away of cinematic junk makes our attention to what remains almost rapt: the clinking of the nuns’ spoons at a silent convent dinner, some gentle country sounds, the transfixing boredom of long drives through the flat landscape. Yet there’s one significant sign of life: in a provincial hotel ballroom, young musicians play Western-style Polish pop and American jazz. A handsome young saxophone player (Dawid Ogrodnik), who loves Coltrane, takes a respectful but persistent interest in Ida. The jazz, with its breaking patterns, suggests a possible opening to the West, an eventual end to Stalinist drabness, a hint of the very different Poland of 2014.

Fans of the movie have been debating who is the more interesting woman: promiscuous, alcoholic Wanda or faith-endowed Ida. On first viewing, Wanda struck me as one of the great movie characters in recent years. Agata Kulesza, a veteran Polish stage and movie actress, has short black hair, dark eyes, and an almost comically intense frown; her stare could shear the fender off a car. Earlier in her life, Wanda was a player—“the Red Wanda,” a Stalinist state prosecutor who sent “enemies of the people” to their death for the good of the revolution. As she questions peasants in her town about their acts at the end of the war, she’s both a Jewish avenger and a woman who has her own guilt to bear. Ida can’t possibly understand, but Wanda tells her of her past in brief fragments, and Kulesza does more with those fragments—adding a gesture, a pause—than anyone since Greta Garbo, who always implied much more than she said.

Without too much trouble, we can create a past for this brilliant woman. She was a member of the Young Communist League in the thirties; she escaped the Nazis by going underground and fighting in the resistance and emerged in 1947 as a true believer. It is well known that some of the Jews who survived the Nazis (often by fleeing to Moscow) entered the state service in the secret police, which, to put it mildly, was not a popular move among Polish anti-Communists (or among Polish anti-Semites, either). Wanda, we gather, was smarter than many of the others, but by 1961 she has lost her faith. Her world was not born again in revolution; it suffered a long, debilitating, and shameful aftermath to the war. Red Wanda has been twice betrayed—by the slaughter of the Jews and Polish anti-Semitism, and then by Stalinism, which she enabled. By 1961, very little keeps her going—a good apartment, surviving instincts of command, a few acid jokes, Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony, booze, and sexual hunger. She’s intensely likable, a tough woman too clear-headed to lie about anything, especially to herself. “Ida” may be a small story of two particular women seeking identity, but Wanda, we can’t help thinking, is Polish history, both grieved over and unredeemed.

At first glance, Ida is not as interesting—or, rather, she’s guarded, even opaque. When Wanda tells her she’s Jewish, Agata Trzebuchowska stares back, unblinking, unresponsive. Ida has nothing in her head that she can connect to Wanda’s revelations, and, for a long time, she looks at the world evenly, steadily, without much emotion. Her lustrous hair covered, her face framed by a hood, Trzebuchowska has a preternatural calm and self-sufficiency, so it’s amusing to hear that this first-time actress is actually a feminist and hipster discovered in a Warsaw café by a director friend of Pawlikowski’s. She didn’t particularly want the part; Pawlikowski, who had auditioned many young women without finding anyone he liked, had to argue her into it. The results are mixed: we get an extraordinary-looking woman, but we miss the skill of a trained actress. Trzebuchowska can’t suggest what’s churning around inside Ida, yet her opacity must be what Pawlikowski wanted, and it has its uses: it keeps mystery alive. Will Ida, exposed to the world in all its bewildering complication, maintain her faith and her desire to be a nun, or will she accept herself as a Jew? Back in the convent for a while, she prostrates herself on the stone floor, apologizing for sins that she hasn’t committed.

“Ida” is only eighty minutes long, but Pawlikowski takes his time. As the two women question farmers and townspeople in Wanda’s old village, they stop to talk things over, fight each other, or just stare silently. The investigation is urgent emotionally yet desultory in action, as such quests are in life, and the relation between the two, established and strengthened by the strategic positioning within the frame, keeps shifting, evolving, reaching a kind of emotional finality. Pawlikowski must have stripped away dialogue, too, since not much is stated: what we infer is what ultimately matters. Concentrated and expansive at the same time, “Ida” keeps the audience working hard, gathering clues, trying not to come to conclusions too quickly. As David Thomson put it in The New Republic, the movie “[dares] to omit essential actions because they have been delivered indirectly.” The violence, after all, was long in the past. What matters in 1961 (and now) is the attitudes of those who committed or suffered crimes. Without giving up judgment, the filmmakers establish that during the war, everyone in Poland was in trouble. Acknowledgment, not revenge, is the movie’s driving force.

Pawlikowski has complained about critics who see the movie solely as a meditation on the Holocaust or Poland, and, of course, he’s partially right, since “Ida” is certainly a story of identity; it’s certainly a spiritual journey, too. His irritation may be caused by a certain hostility in Poland to an exiled filmmaker who returns bristling with ideas about the country. (Pawlikowski may want to work there again, and needs to sweeten the atmosphere.) Whatever he says, he’s made a movie that breathes history in every frame, and his annoyance reminds me of D. H. Lawrence’s remark, “Never trust the teller, trust the tale. The proper function of a critic is to save the tale from the artist who created it.” All right, then: again and again, “Ida” asks the question, What do you do with the past once you’ve re-discovered it? Does it enable you, redeem you, kill you, leave you longing for life, longing for escape? The answers are startling.

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INDIEWIRE
May 1. 2014 Steve Dollar
How the Director of ‘Ida’ Turned Polish History Into Compelling Drama

Although its motivating narrative element involves a reconciliation with souls lost in the Holocaust, one of the most appealing aspects of Pawel Pawlikowski’s “Ida” is that it never feels narrowed or overwhelmed by so specific or loaded a historical impulse. But that’s not to say that it doesn’t embrace a historical moment. Indeed, the film is an effort to recapture a time and place – Warsaw, 1962 – that the director can only claim first-hand through childhood memories.

The film’s austere yet richly textured black-and-white recalls the snapshots from the Pawlikowski’s own family photo album, although a more cinematic reference would be Ingmar Bergman’s “Winter Light,” also reflected in a shared theme in which religious faith is tested against a more existentialist worldview. Born in 1957, the filmmaker would have been 5 when the events in “Ida” transpire, but in conversation at the Sundance Film Festival this January he explained how the script, co-written with Rebecca Lenkiewicz, resonates closely with his own story.

The premise of “Ida” brings together two woman who, on the surface, could not be more different. Wanda (Agata Kulesza, best-known for her work on the Polish stage) is a dissolute judge and former prosecutor whose status has fallen with the decline of Stalinism. The camera catches her at an expressionistic tilt as she stumbles drunkenly through one-night stands with an attitude of stoic self-negation. Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska, who previously had not appeared on film), a novice nun who has turned 18 and is about to take her vows, leaves the convent where she was raised as an orphan to meet Wanda, her aunt, who breaks the news to her innocent niece that her real name is Ida, that she is a Jew and that her parents were killed during World War II. From there, they begin a journey. Ostensibly, it is to find the place where the bodies have been buried, and cast an eye on the culpable parties, but the odyssey also provides the occasion for the women to look for themselves in the mirror of each others’ psyches as Poland at last began to loosen its collar with the dawn of the 1960s.

“It was the period when many things became a little bit more possible after the death of Stalin,” says Pawlikowski, who left Warsaw behind as a teenager and was, until recently, a resident of England, where he launched his career as an unconventional documentarian for the BBC. “By 1962, the heroic period of building communist Poland was over, heroic meaning also murderous, and suddenly a little bit of air was let in and communism became a little bit more shabby and pragmatic. It was called the ‘period of normalization.’ We were building a new society.” Citing the influence of Western culture such as jazz, he added, “Poland was the most liberal society in the Eastern Bloc at the time. It was known as the most jolly barrack in the communist camp. There were cool attitudes, a lot of hipster activity and postures which was kind of sweet at the time.”

Although Pawlikowski’s ballerina mother was Catholic, his father, a doctor, was Jewish. “He never publicized that fact,” the director said. “It wasn’t a big deal but obviously he was keeping it to himself. My father’s side of the family was mysteriously absent.” Figuring out the truth set the filmmaker on a path to asking more questions. “I discovered that my grandmother on his side died in Auschwitz,” he said. “I wanted to ask, what does it mean to be Catholic, to be Christian.”

Ida’s flirtation with a charming American jazz saxophonist she meets one night opens up another facet of the film. “Naima,” one of John Coltrane’s most heart-achingly lyrical ballads, sets the tone – a strange and compelling new language for the girl, suggesting that the worldliness of the jazz club offers its own kind of spiritual transcendence. The song opens up one of the kinds of windows that the film presents to each woman, drawing them towards acts of major consequence. “It’s so beautiful and mystical,” Pawlikowski said. “It captures the mind and feels like a meditation. She understands jazz and she thinks she understand the boy.”

The director, whose past includes a stint as a jazz pianist “who couldn’t get out of the shadows of Chick Corea and Keith Jarrett,” also uses the interlude as nod to the days when “there was a little bit of swinging going on in Poland.” This was the heyday of Krzysztof Komeda, whose soundtrack graced Roman Polanski’s debut “Knife in the Water.”

The filmmaker described the atmosphere on set as akin to a laboratory. With a locked-down camera observing dramatic interiors and wide-open landscapes, the film has both a deliberate photographic quality and an artful kitchen-sink mise-en-scene. There was no coverage. Instead, Pawlikowski said he wanted the strongest images. “Not pretty, but right and rich and kind of emotional,” he explained. “Some friends accuse me of making it too formal to be emotional.”

Those friends would be wrong. In Pawlikowski’s aesthetic, the power lies in his actors’ faces, in the light and shadow, in the distance of a gaze, in the discovery of a instant. “I’m so sick of cheap emotion nowadays,” he said. “A handheld camera conveys emotions even when there aren’t any. The shots have emotions because of what I put in them and how they are lit. It’s a magic space, and I wanted each moment to have its own kind of value.”

Pawlikowski mentions that “Ida” has gotten some backlash in Poland for not dealing more explicitly with the Holocaust. “Some people kind of resent that it’s not about a settling of accounts, or about guilt,” he said. “It is that, but it’s more about the journey of these two women. One journey ends quite drastically…and the other ends quite drastically.”

But he admitted that there was a bigger picture as well. “Possibly, it’s about the impossibility of living in Poland in 1962. Or the impossibility of living in the world in general. I left it open,” he said. “I wanted it to work by poetic principles rather than prosaic ones: To resonate within the viewer.”

The acclaim since its premiere last fall at the Telluride Film Festival suggests that the approach paid off. “I’m surprised it’s as popular as it is,” he said. “I really thought I was making professional hari-kari. Polish films are so uncool in the world.”

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INDIEWIRE
April 29, 2014 Greg Cwik
Review: How the Bleak Drama ‘Ida’ Channels Ingmar Bergman Movies

Shot in Bergman-approved 4:3, Pawel Pawlikowski’s gorgeously bleak “Ida” is a keen retrograde study of classic European cinema that simultaneously feels timeless. It reaches back to the advent of the Eastern European art film in its rhetorical musings, but it doesn’t succumb to the cute conventions of a period piece, which make its setting difficult to pin down (probably somewhere in the late-1950s, given the key presence of Coltrane’s pre-A Love Supreme music in the film). But with its elegant imagery and a story that follows suit, the film has a genuine feel and demands to be taken seriously.

In parsing the solace sought by Christians, Jews, and nonbelievers in Cold War-era Poland, “Ida” asks eternal questions to which it can’t possibly offer comfort or closure, so it doesn’t try. Pawlikowski avoids peddling in pedantic philosophizing, nor does he seek epiphanies in tortuous sensationalism in order to leave his viewers utterly depressed; he instead reflects on the everyday sadness that pervades common life. His is an eye and ear for truth instead of facts — Bergman by way of Tom Wolfe, if you will — but without the exclamation points. Notions of identity and the self— temporal, tangible, ethereal, spiritual are threaded through each scene, and the duality of life and death lingers in every shot.

“Ida” requires some commitment on the viewer’s part, but its sober, silent rewards are profound. A young nun named Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska) on the verge of taking her vows discovers that her name isn’t actually Anna, but Ida, and she is actually Jewish, contrary to her life-long conviction. Her family was murdered and buried in the forlorn backwoods in unmarked graves, far from sacred ground, and Ida has lived her life under false pretenses.

This understandably upsets her, and shakes the foundation of her faith. She determinedly sets out to find someone, anyone, who knew her family. With her hard-drinking pessimist Aunt Wanda (Agata Kulesza) behind the wheel, Ida goes on a road trip to find her parents’ bones. Trzebuchowska taps the sad, lonely stoicism used to great effect by Liv Ullmann in “Persona” and “The Passion of Anna” — her still eyes and thin non-frown barely disguise the turmoil percolating underneath. Aunt Wanda, conversely, is considerably more animated in her sorrow. At a satiating 80 minutes, this lean (but not emaciated) vivisection of faith and identity really digs at the fears, both overt and indiscernible, of post-WWII Poland.

Pawlikowski and cinematographer Lukasz Zal channel art-house aesthetics with ease, and at times “Ida” has the feel of an authentic lost Bergman film. Pawlikowski frames his shots with the tight, tense precision of a still-life photographer: horizontal lines transecting the screen, characters taking up the lower-thirds of shots, vast blank walls acting as canvases against which people and objects are placed, like furniture in a carefully-decorated set. His direction isn’t natural, and the immaculate 4:3 shots certainly draw attention to themselves, but, more importantly, Pawlikowski heightens the banal realism of his film, casting the quotidian as a series of tragic art pieces, suffusing it with an air of stillness and the epochal pause of a museum exhibit.

The black and white perception of religious orthodoxy is rendered in bleak gray scale, and the myriad static shots capture a world at once rife with proscribed change and devoid of progress, its people desperately sweeping the past under the rug. The heart-piercing realism is crafted with astute framing and a sort of hyper-realistic use of deep focus, which, in the almost-square 4:3, creates the disquieting sensation of experiencing a caroled, controlled version of everyday life, not unlike Bergman’s “God’s Silence” trilogy. But unlike those films, which can feel like a passive assault on one’s attention span, “Ida” laces the seriousness with wit, and something resembling charm manifests in one-liners alongside surprisingly irreverent humor.

Unlike the careful mise en scene, the jokes do feel natural, the lame efforts of damaged people looking for serenity in fleeting quips. The morbidity is tough but not relentless. Pawlikowski doesn’t punish his viewers, he simply challenges them. Take the vow to dedicate your attention to “Ida” and you’ll be rewarded deeply.

pawryszard

Pawel Pawlikowski
Writer and Director
SELECTED FILMOGRAPHY

IDA (feature film in Polish, written and directed, 2013)

LA FEMME DU CINQUIEME (feature film, written and directed, completed Summer 2011)

THE RESTRAINT OF BEASTS (feature film, 2006 – abandoned)

MY SUMMER OF LOVE (feature film, written and directed, 2004)
BEST FILM Edinburgh Film Festival
BAFTA Best British Film
BEST SCREENPLAY Evening Standard Awards
BEST DIRECTOR Directors’ Guild of Great Britain
BEST NEW ACTORS Evening Standard Awards
BEST FILM, BEST ACTOR Cabourg Film Festival, France
EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS (nomintated) Best Film, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Photography
BEST FOREIGN FILM Polish Film Academy
BEST FILM Oslo Film Festival
FESTIVAL SCREENINGS Toronto, London, Thessaloniki, Rotterdam, Berlin, Sofia

LAST RESORT (feature film, written and directed, 2000)
BAFTA Best Newcomer
BEST FILM Edinburgh Film Festival
BEST FILM Thessaloniki Film Festival
BEST FILM Gijon Film Festival Spain
BEST FILM Motovun Festival, Croatia
EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS Discovery Prize nominated
BEST DIRECTOR ‘Heimat’ award by German Ministry of Culture
FIPRESCI PRIZE Thessaloniki, London Film Festivals
BEST ACTRESS Thessaloniki and Gijon
BEST ACTOR Thessaloniki

TWOCKERS (medium length drama, co-written and directed with Ian Duncan, 1998)

TRIPPING WITH ZHIRINOVSKY (doc 1995)
GRIERSON AWARD, Best British Documentary
GOLDEN GATE AWARD, San Francisco Film Festival

THE GRAVE CASE OF CHARLIE CHAPLIN (short, 1993)

SERBIAN EPICS (doc 1992)
GRAN PRIX, Documentary Film Festival Marseille
GRAN PRIX, Festival dei Popoli, Florence

DOSTOEVSKY’S TRAVELS (doc 1991)
ROYAL TELEVISION SOCIETY AWARD
EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY special mention
CANADIAN ‘ROCKY’ at Banff
PRIX ITALIA

FROM MOSCOW TO PIETUSHKI (doc 1990)
EMMY INTERNATIONAL
PRIX ITALIA
CANADIAN ‘ROCKY’ at Banff
ROYAL TELEVISION SOCIETY AWARD

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INDIEWIRE SydneysBuzz
May 1, 2014 Sydney Levine
Interview: Ida by Pawel Pawlikowski

I happen to love Jewish films and so when I saw Ida was playing in Toronto, it was first on my list of “must-sees”. However, I am no longer an “acquisitions” person, nor am I a film reviewer. My work keeps me out of the screening room because we work with filmmakers looking to get their films into the hands of those who will show their films. In other words, we advise and strategize for getting new films into the film circuit’s festivals, distributors’ and international sales agents’ hands.

So I missed Ida at its TIFF debut. In Cartagena, where I was invited to cover the festival for SydneysBuzz and where I was gathering information for the book I am currently writing on Iberoamerican Film Financing, it showed again in the jewel-box of a theater in this jewel-box of a city. But when I saw the first shots – and fell in love with it – I also saw it was subtitled in Spanish and rather than strain over translating, I left the theater. Later on, Pawel Pawlikowski and I sat next to each other at a fabulous dinner in one of Cartagena’s many outdoor squares, and we discussed the title of my book rather than his films which was a big loss on one hand but a big gain for me on the other because we got to speak as “civilians” rather than keeping the conversation on a “professional” level.

Now Music Box is opening IDA in L.A. on May 2nd at the Laemmle in L.A. and in N.Y. and I made sure to take advantage of my press status, not only to see the film but to interview Pawel on himself and the film.

There were two ways to look at this film: as a conceit, as in, “what a great story – a girl about to take her vows in the convent which raised her discovers she is Jewish and returns to the society which destroyed her family” — or as a journey of a fresh soul into the heart of humanity and finds that she is blessed by being able to decide upon her own destiny within it.

Parenthetically, this seems to me to be a companion piece to the Berlinale film Stations of the Cross by , another journey of a fresh soul into the spiritual life of religion as she struggles in the society which formed her.

And so I began my interview with Pawel:

I could look at this film in two ways, I’ve heard the audiences talk about whether the film is Anti-Polish or Anti-Semitic, but that is not my concern, I want to know if it is just a great story or does it go deeper than that?

Pawel immediately responded, I THINK he said, “I am not a professional filmmaker, and I do not make a ‘certain type of film’. I make films depending on where I am in life. A film about exile, a film about first love. Films mark where I am in my life.

In the 60s, when I was a kid and first saw the world…seeing the world for the first time…life is a journey and filmmaking marks where you (the audience) are in life and it marks where I am in life. Each film is different as a result.

After making Woman on the 5th, about the hero’s (in my own head) being lost in Paris, a weird sort of production – directed by a Polish director with a British and an American actor and actress, I craved solid ground, a familiar place or a “return” to important things of the past, and I returned to a certain period in Poland which I found very much alive, for myself then and again as I made this movie and in Polish history itself.

Ida takes place 17 years after the war and shortly after after Stalin’s crimes were being made public by Krushchev. The Totalitarian State of Poland bent a bit; censorship was lifted a bit and a new culture was developing. Music was jazz and rock and roll. Poland was very alive then: the spirit of going your own way, not caring what anyone thinks, creating a style in cinema, in art, music…

I myself was a young boy in the 60s and I left Poland in 71 when I was 13 to stay with my mother in England where she had married a Brit. My father lived in the West; they were divorced and I went for a holiday and stayed.

I went to school in the U.K. but at 13, I was thrown out and I went to Germany where my father lived and matriculated there. I couldn’t go back to Poland as I had left illegally and was only allowed back in to visit in the late 70s. I returned in 1980 during Solidarity and from 1989 to the fall of the Wall, I went back often.

Ida is a film about identity, family, faith, guilt, socialism and music. I wanted to make a film about history that wouldnʼt feel like a historical film— a film that is moral, but has no lessons to offer. I wanted to tell a story in which ʻeveryone has their reasonsʼ; a story closer to poetry than plot. Most of all, I wanted to steer clear of the usual rhetoric of the Polish cinema. The Poland in Ida is shown by an ʻoutsiderʼ with no ax to grind, filtered through personal memory and emotion, the sounds and images of childhood…

I read you are going to make another film about Poland…

It is not about Poland but it is set in Poland. I am working on 3 projects which is how I work. I keep writing and find one of them has the legs to carry me…which one is not yet known.

You mentioned in an interview with Sight and Sound your top 10 films…

Yes, which ones did you like? They ask me this every year and every year the list changes for me. There are other good ones, like Once Upon a Time in Anatolia…they are not all the old classics and they are not necessarily my favorites or what I think are “the best”. Again they depend on where I am in my own life.

The ones I like on your list were Ashes and Diamonds which I saw in New York in my freshman year in college, La Dolce Vita …One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Some Like It Hot .

I actually think 8 ½ is more remarkable than La Dolce Vita. I also like Loves of a Blonde very much….

I found Ashes and Diamonds so extraordinary, I then had to see the actor in Man of Marble which took me to the next Man of Steel and Man of…whatever… until I thought I knew Wadja. What did you make of this film?

I saw it later as I was too young when it came out in the 60s. I saw it in the 70s when it was already a classic. Its impact on me was that it was well-done and about something. It is a comment about a man who decides whether to fight or to live. It could be remade in any country coming out of civil war.

To return to Ida, I noticed stylistic choices you made that I would like you to comment on.

The landscapes and interiors were very large and sparse. Interiors always had someone in the back ground moving, arranging or walking by in silence.

Yes there is always some life and the movements of people in the background are like music in the film, though it is not really music…

Yes, the music in the film is great. The magnificence of the classical music someone is playing, like the sister…

Yes I only want to use real music at times that real music is part of the story. I didn’t want film music. I wanted it to come out of silence. It is part of the scene like the background movement of people. Each piece means something. The pop songs were key from the start. They were fatally imprinted on my childhood memory. They really color the landscape. Coltrane and stuff came from my adult self.

Incidentally, the late 50s and early 60s were great for jazz in Poland. There was a real explosion: Komeda, Namyslowski, Stanko, Wroblewski… Apart from telling Idaʼs story, I wanted to conjure up a certain image of Poland, an image that I hold dear. My country may have been grey, oppressive and enslaved in the early 60s, but in some ways it was ‘cooler’ and more original than the Poland of today, and somehow more universally resonant.

Iʼm sure that lots of Poles with a chip on their shoulder, and there are many, will fail to notice the beauty, the love that went into our film—and will accuse me of damaging Poland’s image by focusing on the melancholy, the provincial, the grotesque… And then there’s the matter of a Polish farmer killing a Jewish family… thereʼs bound to be trouble. On the other hand, thereʼs also a Stalinist state prosecutor of Jewish origins, which might land me in hot water in other quarters. Still, I hope the film is sufficiently specific and un-rhetorical enough to be understood on its own terms.

The music Ida’s sister was playing before she…what are your thoughts about her sister?

Neither Ida nor her sister is typical. Wanda’s imprimatur is that she has no self-pity, no regrets, no sentimentality.

She had fought in the resistance rather than raise a family. She had been a super idealistic Marxist, became a part of the New Establishment and got drawn into the games and hypocrisy, sending people to death for “impeding progress”.

She reminds me of my father in some ways. Her acerbic sense of humor. I gave her some of my father’s lines.

Where Did The Character Of Wanda Come From?

When I was doing my post-graduate degree at Oxford in the early 80s I befriended Professor Brus, a genial economist and reformist Marxist who left Poland in ʻ68. I was particularly fond of his wife Helena, who smoked, drank, joked and told great stories. She didn’t suffer fools gladly, but she struck me as a warm and generous woman. I lost touch with the Bruses when I left Oxford, but some 10 years later I heard on BBC News that the Polish government was requesting the extradition of one Helena Brus-Wolinska, resident in Oxford, on the grounds of crimes against humanity. It turned out that the charming old lady had been a Stalinist prosecutor in her late twenties. Among other things, she engineered the death in a show trial of a completely innocent man and a real hero of the Resistance, General ‘Nil’ Fieldorf. It was a bit of a shock. I couldn’t square the warm, ironic woman I knew with the ruthless fanatic and Stalinist hangman. This paradox has haunted me for years. I even tried to write a film about her, but couldnʼt get my head around or into someone so contradictory. Putting her into Idaʼs story helped bring that character to life. Conversely, putting the ex-believer with blood on her hands next to Ida helped me define the character and the journey of the young nun.

By 1956, illusions about society were gone. Stalin’s crimes were revealed in 1961, there was a change of government, a new generation was coming of age. Wanda was a judge they called “Red Wanda” and had sent enemies of the state to their deaths. The older generation was left high and dry. Communism had become a shabby reality. Her despair was apparent– she had been heroic and now the system was a joke.

And then some creature from the past pops up and makes her reveal all she had swept under the carpet. She drank too much, there was no love in her life, only casual sex. But still she was straight-ahead, directed and unstoppable.

And then after the revelations of what had become of their parents and her child, her sister returns to the convent. There is nowhere for her to go. She hits a wall. She is heroic and there is no place for her in society anymore.

And Ida? Why did you choose such a person?

Ida has multiple origins, the most interesting ones probably not quite conscious. Let’s say that I come from a family full of mysteries and contradictions and have lived in one sort of exile or another for most of my life. Questions of identity, family, blood, faith, belonging, and history have always been present.

I’d been playing for years with the story of a Catholic nun who discovers sheʼs Jewish. I originally set it in ʻ68, the year of student protests and the Communist Party sponsored anti-Semitic purges in Poland. The story involved a nun a bit older than Ida, as well as an embattled bishop and a state security officer, and the whole thing was more steeped in the politics of the day. The script was turning out a little too schematic, thriller-ish and plotty for my liking, so I put Ida aside for a while and went to Paris to make The Woman In The Fifth . I was in a different place at the time.

When I came back to Ida, I had a much clearer idea of what I wanted the film to be. My cowriter Rebecca Lenkiewicz and I stripped the whole thing down, made it less plotty, the characters richer and less functional. Ida became younger, more inexperienced, more of a blank slate, a young girl on the brink of life. Also we moved the story to ʻ62, a more nondescript period in Poland, but also a time of which I have most vivid memories, my own impressions as a child – unaware of what was going on in the adult world, but all the more sensitive to images and sounds. Some shots in the film couldʼve come from my family album.

In the course of the film, Ida undergoes a change. She becomes energized. When she returns to the convent you can see it in her body movements. It is the only time we used a hand-held camera to depict the new energy she has acquired. She is going into the spiritual in a different way. The old way elicited a giggle from her; she had seen the sensuality of the novice nun bathing…whether she is returning to the convent to stay is left to the viewer to decide.

The viewer is brought into a space of associations they make on their own, the film is more like poetry where the feeling of the viewer is the private one of the viewer, not one the film imposes.

Yes, each sister enters a new reality and comes out changed, and I was left thinking there was nothing better of the two life choices, the “normal” life of love and family and the “spiritual” life of simple living and silent devotion. There needs to be some balance between the two, but what is that? I still don’t know.

On a last note: I noticed in the end credits you thanked Alfonso Cuarón. Why was that?

Yes he liked the film a lot. There were many people I thanked, like Agnieszka Holland. These are friends I can show my work to. They protect me against critics and festivals. This group of friends can also be nasty, but they are honest friends.

Thank you so much Pawel for your insights. I look forward to meeting you again “on the circuit”.

To my readers, here are the nuts and bolts of the film:

Music Box Films is the proud U.S. distributor of Ida, the award-winning film written and directed by Pawel Pawlikowski. Ida world premiered at Telluride 2013 and Toronto International Film Festival, where it won the FIPRESCI Award for Best Film; then played the London Film Festival where it won Best Film, and was the Grand Prix winner at the Warsaw Film Festival. It played as an Official Selection in the 2014 Sundance and New York Jewish Film Festivals.

Poland 1962. Anna (newcomer Agata Trzebuchowska) is a beautiful eighteen-year-old woman, preparing to become a nun at the convent where she has lived since orphaned as a child. She learns she has a living relative she must visit before taking her vows, her mother’s sister Wanda. Her aunt, she learns, is not only a former hard-line Communist state prosecutor notorious for sentencing priests and others to death, but also a Jew. Anna learns from her aunt that she too is Jewish – and that her real name is Ida. This revelation sets Anna, now Ida, on a journey to uncover her roots and confront the truth about her family. Together, the two women embark on a voyage of discovery of each other and their past. Ida has to choose between her birth identity and the religion that saved her from the massacres of the Nazi occupation of Poland. And Wanda must confront decisions she made during the War when she chose loyalty to the cause before family.

Following his breakthrough films Last Resort and BAFTA-award winning My Summer of Love, Ida marks Polish-born, British writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski’s first film set in his homeland. Ida stars Agata Trzebuchowska and Agata Kulesza.

2014年カンヌ国際映画祭ラインアップ予想 PARTII

Assasin stills
“The Assassin” (題訳:暗殺者)監督:ホウ・シャオシェン

台湾ニューウェーブの大御所として知られる、シャオシェンはアメリカでは比較的に知られていない、にもかかわらず、彼はカンヌのパルムドールに6回ノミネートされ、「レッド・バルーン」(2007)は批評家に称賛されている。“The Assassin”は唐朝期を舞台にした物語でカンヌへの7回目のノミネートが期待される。

timburton-bigeyes-painting-tsr
“Big Eyes” (題訳:大目玉)監督:ティム・バートン

二年前にカンヌの審査委員長を務めたバートンは巨額な製作費で作られた「アリス・イン・ワンダーランド」(2010)やダーク・シャドウ(2012)で批評家に酷評され、今回は低予算のファンタジーというテーマを避けた作品でカムバックする。これは「エド・ウッド」(1994)以来の事である。本作、”Big Eyes”、には「エド・ウッド」の脚本チーム、スコット•アレクサンダーとラリー・カラゼウスキー、が参加していて、物語は大きな目の子供の絵画を描いて有名になった50年代の画家夫婦、ウォルターとマーガレット・キーンの実話。画家夫婦を演じるのはクリストフ・ワルツとエイミー•アダムス。

bird people
“Bird People” (題訳:鳥人)監督:パスカル・フェラン

最優秀映画でセザールを受賞したDHロレンス原作の映画化「レディ・チャタレー」(2006)以来目立った活動が無かったフェラン監督。あれから十年近くの年月が過ぎ本作では新しい人生をやり直し為にパリにやって来たアメリカ人の男を描く。

eden
“Eden” (題訳:エデン)監督:ミア・ハンセン=ラヴ

わずか33歳で、ミア•ハンセン=ラヴは既に注目に値する監督としてのイメージを確立。彼女の「あの夏の子供たち」は第62回カンヌ国際映画祭ある視点部門特別賞を受賞。本作では90年代に人気があったフレンチ・ハウスのエレクトロニック•ミュージックのDJの人生を描いたドラマで “Frances Ha”の主演スター グレタ・ガーウィグが出演している。

wim-wenders everything will be fine
“Everything Will Be Fine” (題訳:万事うまく収まる)監督:ヴィム•ヴェンダース

オスカー・ノミネートされた3Dドキュメンタリー「Pina/ピナ・バウシュ 踊り続けるいのち」(2011)の成功に続き新作はビョルン•オラフ・ヨハンセンの脚本でジェームズ・フランコ演じる、交通事故を起こし小さな子供の命を奪ったことから平穏な人生を失う男が12年間許しを請い続けるという内容のドラマを3Dで描いている。ヴェンダースの今までにない新たな3Dの手法に期待が集まる。

FoxcatcherSetphotoImagerlstsr01a
“Foxcatcher” (題訳:キツネ追い)監督:ベネット・ミラー

チャニング•テイタム、マーク•ラファロ、スティーヴ・カレル、シエナ•ミラーとヴァネッサ•レッドグレーヴが出演する本映画はオリンピックのレスリング・チャンピオン兄弟マークとデイブ•シュルツと殺人事件につながるデュポン化学の財産相続者で、変わり者のジョン•デュポンとの関係を描いた物語だ。脚本を手掛けたのはE.マックス・フライと「カポーティ」(2005)のダン・フッターマン。

imitation-game
“The Imitation Game” (題訳:模倣ゲーム)監督:モルテン・ティルドゥム

「ヘッドハンター」(2011)がノルウェーの映画興行成績ナンバーワンとなり、今回はハーヴェイ・ワインスタインが高額な製作費を提供し、ベネディクト・カンバーバッチが主演する本作で彼は同性愛者という事で起訴される、第二次世界大戦中に暗号研究をしていたイギリスの数学者アラン•チューリングを描いている。キーラ•ナイトレイとマシュー・グードも出演している。

Paul Thomas Anderson and Joaquin Phoenix
“Inherent Vice” (題訳:先天的な悪癖)監督:ポール・トーマス・アンダーソン 

「ザ・マスター」(2012)に続くアンダーソンの新作は最もカンヌのラインアップが期待されている作品。作品のリリースは12月に予定されているので「ザ・マスター」のようにヴェネチアでの上映か「ゼア・ウィル・ビー・ブラッド」(2007)のように映画祭サーキットを避けての公開も考えられる。それでもトマス・ピンチョンの小説の映画化デビューはやはりカンヌでと期待が高まる。本作品は元彼女とそのボーイフレンドの失踪を調査する私立探偵の物語でホアキン•フェニックス、ジョシュ•ブローリン、オーウェン•ウィルソン、キャサリン・ウォーターストン、リース•ウィザースプーン、イエナ・マローン、ジョアンナ•ニューサム、ベニチオ•デル•トロという俳優陣が集まっている。

knights of cup
“Knights of Cup” and “Untitled” (題訳:カップの騎士と無題の作品)監督:テレンス・マリック

オスカーに二度ノミネートされ「ツリー・オブ・ライフ」(2011)でパルムドールを受賞したマリイク監督についての情報は少なく、今年エントリーするかどうかは難しいところだがもしカンヌに戻るとすれば“Knights of Cup”か、オースチンのミュージック・シーンを描いた無題の作品だと考えられる。クリスチャン•ベール、ナタリー•ポートマン、ライアン•ゴズリング、マイケル•ファスベンダー、ルーニー・マーラとケイト•ブランシェットが出演しているという情報が入っている。

chandor-img_a most violent year
“A Most Violent Year” (題訳:最も暴力的な年)監督:J・C・チャンダー

チャンダー監督のウォール・ストリートを描いたドラマ「マージン・コール」(2011)の脚本賞ノミネートに続き、ロバート・レッドフォード主演の「オール・イズ・ロスト ~最後の手紙~」(2013)を公開、そして今回の新作はクライム・ドラマで「インサイド・ルーウィン・デイヴィス 名もなき男の歌」(2013)のオスカー・アイザックとジェシカ・チャステインが主演を務める、ニューヨークで最も暴力的な年1981年を描いている。

Jon-Stewart-Rosewater
“Rosewater” (題訳:ローズウォーター)監督:ジョン・スチュワート

イラン人ジャーナリスト、マジエール・バハリの手記の映画化。本作品はイランの2009年の大統領選挙の際に100日以上テヘランで拘束されたイラン系カナダ人ジャーナリストの物語だ。

St-Vincent-De-Van-Nuys
“St. Vincent De Van Nuys” (題訳:バンナイズの聖ビンセント)監督:セオドール・メルフィ

自ら執筆した”St. Vincent De Van Nuys”の脚本で今回初の監督を務めている。隣に住む子供の師匠になる人間嫌いで下品で、ナオミ・ワッツ演じるロシア人娼婦と恋愛関係になる快楽主義の帰還兵ビンセントを演じるのはビル・マーレイ。オスカーを狙う為にトロントを選ぶことも考慮できる。

Squirrels+Nuts+
“Squirrel To The Nuts” (題訳:リスは木の実へ)監督:ピーター・ボグダノヴィッチ 

ウェス•アンダーソンとノア・バームバックがプロデユーサーを務める、「おかしなおかしな大追跡」(1972)や「ペーパー・ムーン」(1973)等の作品で知られるボグダノヴィッチの最新コメディー映画に出演するのはジェニファー•アニストン、オーウェン•ウィルソン、ウィル・フォルテとシビル•シェパード。

suite francaise
“Suite Francaise” (題訳:スイート・フランセーズ)監督:ソウル・ディブ

“Suite Francaise”は1940年のフランスが舞台で捕虜となった夫を待つ妻がドイツ人将校と恋に落ちるという設定。ミシェル•ウィリアムズとマティアス・シューネルツが出演する本作品の配給はワインスタイン・カンパニーが手掛けている。

While+Young+
“While We’re Young” (題訳:まだ若いうちに)監督:ノア・ボーンバック 
“Frances Ha”から1年、ボーンバック監督と俳優のベン・スティラーが組んだ新作。スティラー演じる神経質ドキュメンタリー製作者とその妻(ナオミ・ワッツ)が若いカップルと交流を持つことで変化していく様子を描いている。

(資料2014/3/18Indiewire)

2014年カンヌ国際映画祭ラインナップ予想31作品

_sils-maria_stills
“Clouds of Sils Maria”(題訳:シルス•マリアの雲)監督:オリヴィエ•アサヤス 。    

キャスト:ジュリエット•ビノシュ、クロエ・モレッツ、クリステン•スチュワート、ブルーノ•ガンツ、ダニエル•ブリュール、ブラディ・コーベット、ジョニー•フリン。

アサヤスは「カルロス」、「レディ・アサシン」そして2011年には審査員として、3回カンヌのコンペティション部門に参加している。世界三大映画祭すべての女優賞を受賞したフランスの名女優ビノシュが主演。この出演者リストを見るかぎりラインアップ入りの可能性は強い。尊敬されるフランス人監督の初めての英語言語の作品でもあり、今年の映画祭の期待の一本。

“Birdman” (dir. Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu)
“Birdman” (題訳:バードマン)監督:アレハンドロ•ゴンサレス•イニャリトゥ。

キャスト:マイケル•キートン、エマ•ストーン、ナオミ•ワッツ、エドワード•ノートン、ザック・ガリフィアナキス。

アレハンドロ•ゴンザレス•イニャリトゥの長編4作のうち3作はカンヌでプレミア上映している。(「21グラム」はヴェネツィアでプレミアされた)「アモーレス•ペロス」はカンヌで批評家週間最優秀賞を受賞し、「バベル」は最優秀監督を受賞、「BIUTIFUL ビューティフル」は主演男優を受賞している。マイケル•キートンが演じるスーパーヒーロー映画の俳優がブロードウェイでカムバックを試みるというイニャリトゥの新作コメディがカンヌのラインアップにエントリーすることは大いに期待される。

_Maps-to-the-Stars stills
“Maps to the Stars” (題訳:スター豪邸マップ)監督:デヴィッド•クローネンバーグ   

キャスト:ロバート・パティンソン、サラ・ガドン、ジョン•キューザック、ジュリアン•ムーア、ミア・ワシコウスカ、オリヴィア•ウィリアムズ、キャリー•フィッシャー。

デヴィッド•クローネンバーグは過去4回カンヌのコンペティション部門にエントリーしている。1995年に「クラッシュ」で審査員賞を受賞し、2006年に功労賞を受賞、2012年にロバート・パティンソンを主演にむかえて「コスモポリス」でエントリーを果たしている。麻薬依存症や火炎性愛症などの問題をかかえる二人の元子役スターたちと母親の幽霊に悩まされる俳優というツイストのある魅力的な前提からしてコンペティションにエントリーするのではと思われる。

Leviafan
“Leviafan” 監督:アンドレイ・ペトローヴィチ・ズヴャギンツェフ

キャスト:アレクセイ•セレブリャコフ、エレナ・リャードファ、ヴラディミール・ヴドヴィチェンコフ

2003年に制作した初めての長編作品「父、帰る」がヴェネツィア国際映画祭のグランプリ、金獅子を獲得し、2007年には、2作目となる”Izgnanie”(ウィリアム・サローヤン原作)がカンヌで最優秀男優賞を受賞、2011年には第3作「エレーナ」でカンヌ映画祭「ある視点」部門のグランプリを受賞した。審査員特別賞を受賞している事もあり、ロシアの映画監督に再度カンヌのメインラインナップ入りが期待されている。ヨブ記を機械工と腐敗した地方の市長の対立を通して描く野心作でもあり、プロデューサーたちも既にカンヌをターゲットにしている事を発表している。

Homesman stills
“Homesman” 監督:トミー•リー•ジョーンズ

キャスト:トミー•リー•ジョーンズ、ヒラリー•スワンク、メリル•ストリープ、グレース・ガマー、ミランダ•オットー、ヘイリー・スタインフェルド、ウィリアムフィクトナー、ジェームズ•スペイダー、ティム•ブレイク•ネルソン、ジョン•リスゴー、デヴィッド・デンシック。

カンヌは主演男優賞授与をトミー•リー•ジョーンズの監督デビュー作「メルキアデス・エストラーダの3度の埋葬」に授与する事で彼の作品を過小評価しなかった数少ない場所のひとつ。物語は採鉱権を得るために他人の土地を不法に奪い取るのを職業にする男が女性開拓者と一緒に精神的に不安定な女性三人をネブラスカ州からアイオワ州に輸送するというもの。撮影も順調に終了し、充実したキャストを考慮すると受賞獲得に近い一本。

andersson pigeon sitting on the branch
“A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Its Existence” (題訳:ハトが枝にとまりその存在を振り返る)監督:ロイ•アンダーソン。                    

キャスト:ホルガー•アンダーソン、ニッセ・ウェストブロム。

特定の観客層にとってこのユニークなスウェーデンの映画監督、ロイ•アンダーソンの、カンヌへのカムバックほどエキサイティングな出来事は無いだろう。1970年のデビュー以来、アンダーソンは4本の映画しか撮っていない。そして2000年に発表した「散歩する惑星」から始まり「愛おしき隣人」を取り終えてから既に7年が経っているが、3部作を完結させる今回の新作はウェブサイトによると春のプレミアをターゲットにしているという。

HQ-The-Rover-Stilll-With-Robert-Pattinson-Guy-Pearce
“The Rover” (題訳:放浪者)監督:デヴィッド・ミショッド。

キャスト:ロバート・パティンソン、ガイ•ピアース、スクート・マクネイリー、デビッド•フィールド、アンソニー•ヘイズ。

誰もがカンヌの常連と言う分けでは無い、新人にもカンヌ・デビューの機会を与える必要がある。今年カンヌにエントリーする可能性が最も高いニューカマーは、数年前に「アニマル・キングダム」を発表したオーストラリアの映画監督、デヴィッド・ミショッドだと思われる。7月に米国公開を予定しているこの新作はムーディーなポスト黙示録的西部劇でここしばらくの間カンヌへの参加が噂されている一作品。

Le Rancon De La Gloire
“Le Rancon De La Gloire (The Price Of Glory)” (題訳:栄光の代価)(監督:グザヴィエ・ボーヴォワ                                 

キャスト:ブノワ・ポールヴールド、キアラ•マストロヤンニ、ピーター•コヨーテ、ナディーン・ラバキー、ドロレス•チャップリン。

俳優から監督に転身したグザヴィエ・ボーヴォワは近年、「Un château en Italie」や「L’Apollonide: Souvenirs de la maison close」などの映画に登場しているが、彼が成功を収めたのは2010年の監督・脚本作『神々と男たち』で、カンヌで審査員特別グランプリとエキュメニカル審査員賞を受賞している。この新作では1977年のスイスを舞台にしたチャップリンのひつぎ強盗を描いたダーク・コメディに着手している。

“Saint Laurent” (dir. Bertrand Bonello)
“Saint Laurent” (題訳: サンローラン)監督:ベルトラン・ボネロ。       

キャスト:ギャスパー・ウリエル、レア・セドゥ、ルイ•ガレル、ジェレミー・レニエ、アミラ・カサール。

2014年は、フランスでは「トルーマン•カポーティ」とこの伝説的なファッションデザイナーの「イヴ•サンローラン」伝記映画が製作されている。ジャリル・レスペールのイヴ・サンローランは既にベルリンでプレミアを済ませているが、このボネロ・バージョンもカンヌでのお目見えが期待される。

“The Cut” (dir. Fatih Akin)
“The Cut” (題訳:カット)監督:ファティ•アキン。                 

キャスト:タハール•ラヒム、ジョージ•ジョルジオ、アキン・ガジ。

脚本/監督のアキンはすでにカンヌでは人気の的 – 彼は「そして、私たちは愛に帰る」という感動作で2007年にカンヌで脚本賞を受賞した。本作品“The Cut”は先の作品を含む三部作の完結編となる。またアキンは「トラブゾン狂騒曲 ~小さな村の大きなゴミ騒動~」というドキュメンタリーも昨年カンヌで上映している。コンペ部門での新作のエントリーが予想されている。

“The Search” (dir. Michel Hazavanicius)
“The Search”(題訳: 捜索)監督:ミシェル・アザナヴィシウス。        

キャスト:ベレニス・ベホ、アネット•ベニング。

2011年のカンヌは「アーティスト」で盛り上がり、米配給のハーヴェイ・ワインスタインが思わず飛びつき、その後アカデミー賞で最優秀作品賞や監督賞や男優賞を獲得する流れとなった。そして今、多くの人がアザナヴィシウスの、フレッド・ジンネマンの「山河遥かなり」(1947):(戦争孤児がGIによって明るく生まれ変わるさまを描いたヒューマン・ドラマ)、に期待をしている。映画の舞台となるのは現在のチェチェン共和国でベレニス・ベホが主演を務める。昨年の8月に撮影を始めたこの作品、十分エントリーの可能がありそう。

“Two Days, One Night” (dir. Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardennes)
“Two Days, One Night” (題訳:一泊二日)監督:ジャン=ピエール&リュック・ダルデンヌ(ダルデンヌ兄弟として知られる)。                     

キャスト:マリオン•コティヤール、ファブリツィオ・ロンジョーネ。

ベルギーの脚本家で監督でもあるダルデンヌ兄弟はカンヌの常連。1999年の「ロゼッタ」と2005年の「ある子供」がパルムドールを受賞している。三度目の受賞も期待されるこの新作ではメガスターであるマリオン•コティヤールが仕事を維持する為に、ボーナスを放棄するよう同僚を説得するという内容。

“Jimmy’s Hall” (dir. Ken Loach)
“Jimmy’s Hall” (題訳:ジミーのダンスホール)監督:ケン・ローチ。      

キャスト:バリー•ウォード、シモーネ•カービー、アンドリュー•スコット、ブライアン・オバーン、ジム•ノートン。

すべてのケン•ローチの作品が、必ずしもカンヌでプレミア上映されている分けでは無いが、過去25年間、他で上映される事はまれである。 “Jimmy’s Hall”はベテラン英国映画監督の最後の物語映画だと言われているように、そういう時代も終わりに近づいているようだ。彼の新作は1932年にダンスホールの再オープンの為にダブリンに戻る、アイルランドの共産主義指導者を描いた映画だ。5月30日に英国でのリリースが決定している。ローチは二回目のパルムドールを受賞することができるか?

“The Blue Room” (dir. Mathieu Amalric)
“The Blue Room” (題訳:ブルー•ルーム)監督:マチュー•アマルリック。  

キャスト:マチュー•アマルリック、リー•ドラッカー、ステファニー・クルオー。

ジェームズ・ボンド映画に極悪人として出演し、ジュリアン•シュナーベル、スティーブン•スピルバーグやウェス•アンダーソンなど多様なディレクターとのコラボレーションをしたおかげで、マチュー•アマルリックは字幕離れした観客にもスクリーンで馴染みの顔になった。2010年に彼の監督作品「さすらいの女神(ディーバ)たち」はカンヌで監督賞を受賞している。本作品はジョルジュ・シムノンのパルプ・フィクションを題材にしたエロティック・スリラー。クロード・シャブロルやジャン=ピエール•メルヴィルもこの作家の作品を映画化している。

“Welcome To New York” (dir. Abel Ferrera)
“Welcome To New York” (題訳:ニューヨークへようこそ)監督:アベル・フェラーラ    

キャスト:ジェラール•ドパルデュー、ジャクリーン•ビセット、ポール•カルデロン、エイミー•ファーガソン。

アベル・フェラーラはカンヌの常連というよりはヴェネツィアでのプレミアを今まで好んで来ました。「バッド・ルーテナント/刑事とドラッグとキリスト」の監督が「ボディ・スナッチャーズ」に引き続きカンヌに戻るとしたら、それは性的暴行疑惑の数の後に辞任した国際通貨基金の責任者、ドミニク•ストロス・カーンの薄くベールで覆われた誘惑の肖像以外には無いでしょう。昨年バイヤーにフッテージをお目見えさせているのでコンペでは無くサイドバーでの参加だと思われる。

“Amour Fou” (dir. Jessica Hausner)
“Amour Fou” (題訳:気狂いアムール)監督:ジェシカ・ハウスナー。     

キャスト:クリスチャン•フリーデル、ビルテ・シュヌンク、ステファン•グロスマン。

昨年のカンヌでは女性監督の不足が不評を招いた。ヴェネチア国際映画祭5部門受賞した「ルルドの泉」のジェシカ・ハウスナーの次の作品が期待される。劇作家ハインリヒ•フォン•クライストの人生と愛人との自殺に基づいた“Amour Fou”が決まればハウスナーにとっては四度目のカンヌになる。

“Winter Sleep” (dir. Nuri Bilge Ceylan)
“Winter Sleep” (題訳:冬の眠り)監督:ヌリ・ビルゲ・ジェイラン 。     

キャスト:ハルク・ビルギナー、メリサ・ソゼン、デメット・アクバッグ。

2013年1月に撮影されたこの作品がカンヌのラインアップに決まる可能性は薄い。彼の作品は2作しかカンヌでプレミアされていないが、「冬の街」(2002)と“Once Upon a Time in Anatolia”(2011)両方がカンヌでグランプリを受賞している。引退した俳優が妻と妹と積雪でホテルに足止めされるという物語の作品にもチャンスがあるのでは。

“Mr. Turner” (dir. Mike Leigh)
“Mr. Turner”  (題訳:ミスターターナー)監督:マイク•リー。          

キャスト:ティモシー•スポール、レスリー•マンビル、パルムドール、ロジャー•アシュトン•グリフィス。

「秘密と嘘」(1996)と「ネイキッド」(1993)でパルムドールと最優秀監督賞を既に獲得しているマイク•リーにとって全ての新作が受賞の可能性を秘めている。四度のエントリーの内「人生は、時々晴れ」(2002)と「家族の庭」(2010)もカンヌのエントリーを果たしている。本作は時代伝記映画でジョゼフ・マロード・ウィリアム・ターナー(Joseph Mallord William Turner、1775年4月23日 – 1851年12月19日)18世紀末から19世紀のイギリスのロマン主義の画家を描いている。

“The Normal Heart” (dir. Ryan Murphy)
“The Normal Heart” (題訳:正常なハート)監督:ライアン•マーフィー。    

キャスト:マーク•ラファロ、マット•ボマー、テイラー・キッチュ、ジム•パーソンズ、ジュリア•ロバーツ、ジョナサン・グロフ。

本作は5月25日にHBOでプレミア放映されるHIVをテーマにしたドラマ。しかし「恋するリベラーチェ」に匹敵するかどうか…。

“Kuime” (dir. Takashi Miike)
“Kuime” 監督:三池崇史。                            

キャスト:柴咲コウ、片山瞳、市川海老蔵、伊藤英明、舞子。

カンヌは必ずしも、ジャンル映画に好意的な映画祭とは言えないが、三池崇史監督はそれを超越する数少ない中の一人だ。彼は「一命」(2011)と「藁の楯 わらのたて」(2013)でコンペティションにエントリーしている。本作は最も有名な日本の怪談「四谷怪談」の映画化となる。

“Still The Water” (dir. Naomi Kawase)
“Still The Water” (題訳:スティル・ウォーター)監督:河瀬直美。       

キャスト:渡辺真紀子、榊秀夫、村上淳、杉本哲太、松田美由紀。

パルムドールを受賞した唯一の女性監督。「萌の朱雀」で第50回カンヌ国際映画祭カメラ・ドール(新人監督賞)を受賞した。「殯(もがり)の森」(2007)カンヌ国際映画祭で日本人監督として17年ぶりに審査員特別大賞を受賞。本作は海に死体を見つける若いカップルの物語。

“Coming Home” (dir. Zhang Yimou)
“Coming Home”(題訳:帰郷)監督:チャン・イーモウ。             

キャスト:コン•リー、チェン・ダオミン。

チャン・イーモウはカンヌのコンペティション部門に三回エントリーをしている。「活きる」(1994)でグランプリを受賞している。女優コン•リーとチームで撮影された本作は既にラインアップ入り決定との噂もある。労働収容所に送られたのです老人が帰郷するという物語だ。

“Mommy” (dir. Xavier Dolan)
“Mommy” (題訳:ママ)監督:グザヴィエ・ドラン                 

キャスト:アン•ドー、スザンヌ・クレメント、アントアーヌ・オリビエ•ピロン

フランス系カナダ人の神童ドラン監督。彼の前作4本の内3本はカンヌにデビューし、3作すべてがそれぞれのサイドバーでの賞を受賞している。昨年の「トム・アット・ザ・ファーム」(2013)はヴェネツィアで好評を得た。本作は彼の得意とする、おなじみの母/子の関係という領域に戻っている。「マイ・マザー」(2009) と「わたしはロランス」(2012)のスター達も本作品に登場する。今回は初のコンペティション・エントリーが期待される。

“Nymphomaniac Vol IIDirector’s Cut” (dir. Lars Von Trier)
“Nymphomaniac Vol II: Director’s Cut” (題訳:淫乱:ディレクターズカット)監督:ラース•フォン•トリアー                             

キャスト:シャルロット•ゲンズブール、ステランス・カルスゲールド、ステイシー•マーティン、ジェイミー•ベル、シャイア・ラブーフ、ウィレム•デフォー

パルムドールを二回受賞しているラース•フォン•トリアーの“Nymphomaniac”には二部作があり、それぞれに二種類のバージョンが存在している。多くの場合一緒に上映される事は少なく、ワールドリリースも遅れているという混乱ぎみのリリース戦略だ。ベルリンで上映されたバージョン1に引き続き、バージョン2がカンヌで上映されるという噂が広がっている。

“Retour a Ithaque” (dir. Laurent Cantet)
“Retour a Ithaque” (題訳:イサカへ戻る)監督:ローラン・カンテ

キャスト:ホルヘ・ペルゴリア、イザベル•サントス、フェルナンド・エチェバリア、ペドロ•フリオ・ディアス・フェラン。

「パリ20区、僕たちのクラス」(2008)でパルムドール受賞し、「セブン・デイズ・イン・ハバナ」でキューバの映画監督の一人として2012年ある視点部門にエントリーを果たす。本作もハバナで設定され、16年年間亡命をしていた男の復帰お祝いを描いている。

“On The Milky Road” (dir. Emir Kusturica)
“On The Milky Road”(題訳:ミルキーロード)監督:エミール・クストリッツァ      

キャスト:エミール・クストリッツァ、モニカ・ベルーチ、スロボダ・ミカロヴィッチ、ナターシャ・ニンコビッチ、ダヴォル・ジャニック。

セルビア出身のエミール・クストリッツァ監督も2回パルムドールを受賞している。しかし、「アンダーグラウンド」(1995) 以来それほど目立った活躍は無いが、新作は7年ブル長編物語映画となる。しかし最近ロシアのプーチン大統領を支援する声明を出しているので政治的な問題が今回のエントリーを難しくする可能性もある。

“Far from the Madding Crowd” (dir. Thomas Vinterberg)
“Far from the Madding Crowd” (題訳:遠く狂った群集から離れて)監督:トマス・ヴィンターベア。                                  

キャスト:キャリー・マリガン、マイケルシーン、ジュノ・テンプル、トム•スターリッジ、マティアス・スーナールツ。

三人の男性に求婚される女性を描いたトマス•ハーディの小説の映画化。トマス・ヴィンターベアは「セレブレーション」(1998)でカンヌの審査員賞を受賞している。昨年の9月に撮影されたこの作品がエントリーする可能性はまだあると言える。

“How To Catch A Monster” (dir. Ryan Gosling)
“How To Catch A Monster” (題訳:モンスターを捕まえる方法)監督:ライアン・ゴズリング                                     

キャスト:クリスティーナ•ヘンドリックス、マット•スミス、シアーシャローナン、ベン•メンデルゾーン、

イアン•デ•ケイステッカー、エヴァ•メンデス、マチューア・マルリック、ジョディ•フォスター、ジェームズ•フランコ、ギヨーム•カネ。

ライアン・ゴズリングは「ドライヴ」(2011)と「オンリー・ゴッド」(2013)での主演でカンヌに参加してきたが今回は映画監督してのエントリーは可能なのか。しかし既に撮影から1年が過ぎている為、サイドバーでの上映が現実的だと考えられる。
                              
Still from Duane Hopkins' second film, Bypass
“Bypass” (題訳:バイパス)監督:デュアン•ホプキンス。            

キャスト:ジョージ•マッケイ、ベンジャミンディロウェイ、ドナルド•サンプター、シャーロット•スペンサー、フェリシティ•ギルバート。

アンドレア•アーノルドのような社会派現実主義の映画製作者の影に隠れてはいたが、2008年のデュアン•ホプキンスの長編デビュー“Better Things”は力強く記憶に残る一作品だった。あれから5年、本作では病を患う盗難品の売人をジョージ•マッケイが演じている。監督週間またはある視点での上映の可能性は考えられる。

“Magic In The Moonlight” (dir. Woody Allen)
“Magic In The Moonlight” (題訳:月光の魔法)監督:ウディ•アレン。    

キャスト:コリン•ファース、エマ•ストーン、マーシャ•ゲイ•ハーデン、ジャッキー•ウィーバー、ハミッシュ•リンクレイター。

ウディ•アレンは「マッチポイント」(2005)、「それでも恋するバルセロナ」(2008)、「恋のロンドン狂騒曲」(2010)、「ミッドナイト・イン・パリ」(2011)でカンヌ映画祭にエントリーを果たしている。「ミッドナイト・イン・パリ」が良い評論を得たから既に三年が過ぎている。新作の時代設定は1920年でフランスのリビエラが舞台となるロマンチック・コメディだ。今回のラインアップには良い作品だと思われる。

“Free Fall” (dir. Giorgy Palfi)
“Free Fall” (題訳:フリーフォール)監督:ジョルジ・パルフィー。

キャスト:ピロシュカ・モルナール、レカ・テンキ、ジョルト・ナジ、ジョルト・トリル、イレーン・ボルダン。

ベラ・ターの引退後、ハンガリー・シネマは新たなリーダーを必要としている。ジョルジ・パルフィーが適役だと思われる。彼の長編二作目“Taxidermia”は2006年のある視点で注目を集めている。本作はアパートの屋上から飛び降りた女性が地に落ちるまでにそこに住む人々の暮らしを目にするという内容でコンペティッション部門が期待される。

(資料:3月 17, 2014 INDIEWIRE)

Poland Film Festival 2013 at Shibuya Theater Image Forum

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Poland Film Festival 2013 (Nov.30 – Dec.13) introduces 10 films from the 1960’s in Poland and also seven masterpieces of the legendary Polish film director, Andrzej Wajda. The encore screenings will allow you to catch up with the films screened in the past film festival. The Poland Film Festival also screens three Japan Premieres this year as well as two selections of animations, 7 episodes each.

MILCZENIE (SILENCE)
1963/102 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director:Kazimierz Kutz, Scriptwriter: Jerzy Szczygiel, Cinematographer:Wieslaw Zdort

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Set in 1945 Poland film shows the story of a boy accused unjustly of trying to blow up a priest with a bomb and who is blinded in an explosion. The priest knows the boy is innocent, but afraid he will lose his stature and hero-worship by revealing that fact. Boy eventually overcomes the torment and goes back to life; the situation, however, remains unresolved due to the silence of the priest. – By Polish Cinema Database

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Director: Kazimierz Kutz
Exceptional film and theatre director, screenwriter. Born on the 16th of February 1929 in Szopienice, in the region of Silesia. In 1953 he graduated from the State Higher School of Film, Television and Theatre in Łódź. Between 1979 and 1982 he was a lecturer in the Department of Radio and Television at the University of Silesia. In 1981 he became president of the Śląskie Towarzystwo Filmowe (Silesian Film Society), of which he was a co-founder. In the same year he was elected chairman of the Porozumienie Środowisk Twórczych Regionu Śląskiego Solidarności (“Solidarity” Alliance of Creative Communities of the Silesian Region). He was a participant of the “Solidarity” Trade Union sponsored Cultural Congress that was interrupted on the day Martial Law was introduced in Poland.

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Among those interned by the country’s new military rulers, he was released after a few days. To protest the military attack on the “Wujek” Coal Mine, he resigned as the general director of Katowice Regional Television, a position he had held since 1976. In 1986 he began teaching in the Directing Department of the State Higher School of Theatre in Krakow, and in 1990 he was appointed managing director of Krakow Regional Television. He resigned from this post one year later after a series of attacks the Solidarity Trade Union chapter at the institution. In 1997 he received an honorary doctorate from the University of Opole and during the same year was elected to the Polish Senate as a representative of the Unia Wolności (Freedom Union) party. He retains his parliamentary seat to this day and has been a deputy speaker of the Senate since 2001. (Culture.PL)

SALTO
1965/106 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director/Writer:Tadeusz Konwicki, Cinematographer:Kurt Weber

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A man hops off a train by the small town where he claims he was before. His presence allows to bring out the inner feelings and beliefs of the inhabitants. A man who has hidden through all of the war because he looked Jewish, even if he is not, took on a fame of a dead Jewish actor he resembles. The visitor’s wife shows up to claim his and indicate that he is always running off. He escapes in the end for another town. – By Polish Cinema Database

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Director:Tadeusz Konwicki
Prose writer, screenwriter and film director. Founder of the ‘cinema des auteurs’ in Poland and author of 20 books. Born in 1926 in Nowa Wilejka, near Vilnius (today Naujoji Vilnia, Lithuania). Konwicki’s literary and cinematic legacy serves as both the conscience of Polish society and the skewed mirror in which it is reflected. He is among those writers who have left the most lasting impression on post-war Polish literature and culture, regarded as a spokesman for the dreams, hopes and frustrations of several generations of Poles. (Culture.PL)

WALKOWER (WALKOVER)
1965/70 min./B&W/Digital
Director/Writer:Jerzy Skolimowski, Cinematographer:Antoni Nurzynski

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Skolimowski’s second feature, Walkower, in many ways follows on from his diploma film, Rysopis/Identification Marks: None (1964), in which engineering student Andrzej Leszczyc (Jerzy Skolimowski) is preparing to begin military service. In Walkower, Andrzej has left the army, and appears to drift around the country participating in boxing fights. In an industrial town, he runs into Teresa (Aleksandra Zawieruszanka), a government engineer, who has arrived to implement a new project at a factory. Andrzej wins in a local boxing match, but decides to leave with Teresa instead of facing a much stronger opponent the next day. In a stunning long take shot from a moving train, Andrzej’s previous opponent follows him on a motorbike and goads him for his cowardice in forfeiting the fight. Andrzej subsequently jumps from the train and returns to the ring. His opponent, however, fails to turn up, and Andrzej wins in a “walkover”. (Senses of Cinema)

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Director:Jerzy Skolimowski
Film director, script writer, actor. He is also a poet and painter, and was a boxer in his youth. He was born in 1938 (some sources quote documents, which the director says are forged, giving 1936 as his year of birth). He graduated in ethnography from Warsaw University in 1959, and in directing from the National Film and Theatre School (today’s PWSFTviT) in Łódź in 1963. His short film “Boks / Boxing” won the Grand Prix at the International Sport Film Festival in Budapest in 1962.

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He debuted as a script writer in 1960 with the film “Niewinni czarodzieje / Innocent Sorcerers”, directed by Andrzej Wajda and Roman Polański’s Knife in the Water. His feature directing debut came in 1964 with Rysopis” / “Identification Marks: None. This film was made in an unusual way, as it was compiled from several of the director’s student films made over a period of time. Jerzy Skolimowski has lived and worked abroad since 1967, in Italy, Britain and the United States, spending the last two decades in California. (Culture.Pl)

TRZECIA CZESC NOCY (THE THIRD PART OF THE NIGHT)
1972/105 min./Color/Digitally Remastered
Director/Writer:Andrzej Zulawski, Cinematographer:Witold Sobocinski

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Set during the occupation of Poland during World War II. Some German soldiers, slaughter a woman, her son and daughter-in-law. The husband and his father escape by being in the forest. The young man decides to join the resistance but at the first meeting Gestapo kills his go-between and chase him. During his escape he gets into an apartment of a pregnant woman and helps her with the childbirth. He works in the typhus center where he is guinea pig for lice after being immunized to make more vaccine. He goes to the hospital to end a misery of a man mistaken by him and tortured where he seems to see his own body and is finally reconciled with himself. – By Polish Cinema Database

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Director:Andrzej Zulawski
Director, screenwriter, novelist, essayist and actor born on the 22nd of November 1940 in Lvov (now Ukraine). A non-conformist visionary of world cinema, his approach to storytelling is idiosyncratic and characterised by explosions of violence, sexuality, and despair. The actors in his movies have played out the most intensely high-pitched emotions in cinema history which inspired the French to coin the term “Zuławskienne,” meaning “over the top”. In an interview with Margaret Barton-Fumo Żuławski describes his films as provoking a certain kind of awareness, nervousness, open-eyed-ness. Although remaining unclassifiable, the vision of the world portrayed in his films has been described as tragic, shocking and hysterical, Żuławski himself retorts, I do not make films in order to shock through form. I do not want to shock with things which I would consider to be esthetically, ethically or morally ugly. If there are difficult and brutal things in these films or if the films show a world which is not necessarily pretty or bright, the aim is to go through a tunnel and get to some light. There is a purpose, a method, in it. (…) The films are intended to send in motion the audience’ feelings, thoughts, nerves, senses – in every respect. (Culture.Pl)

SANATORIUM POD KLEPSYDRA (THE HOURGLASS SANATORIUM)
1973/125 min./Color/Digitally Remastered
Director/Writer:Wojciech Has, Cinematographer:Witold Sobocinski

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Set in pre- World War II era. A young man is on a strange train to see his dying father in a sanatorium. But the place is going to ruin and recalls a lot of memories from the past. He is beset by soldiers from the past, colonial black mercenaries, girls from his early life, and his parents. It is an interior adventure, with unusual atmospheric flair and extraordinary sets. – By Polish Cinema Database

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Director: Wojciech Jerzy Has
Film director and screenwriter. Born in Krakow in 1925, died in Łódź in 2000. Best known for directing The Manuscript Found in Saragossa and The Hour-Glass Sanatorium. Has is often referred to as a visionary of Polish cinema. Critics note that he created a body of work that was surprisingly cohesive in its poetics, as if the director were recounting the same tale in various ways. In practically every film he has created his own world. The adventures of his protagonists, their problems and the storylines in which they become embroiled were always of secondary importance compared to experience of the visual environment in which the action takes place. These worlds are like journeys through the labyrinth of time with its own particular narrative rhythm, and Has’s use of an array of strange objects (critics often use the term rupieciarnia – a random collection) create a unique visual universe. As the director himself has said of his cinematic style, “In the dream that is a film one often has a singular time loop. Things of the past, issues long gone, are overlaid onto current reality. The subconscious invades reality. Dreams thus allow us to reveal, to show the future”. Has studied in Krakow at the city’s Business School during the German occupation of Poland. He went on to study at the School of Art Industry, essentially the underground facility of the Academy of Fine Arts, until it was closed down in 1943. After the war he went on to study at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow. In 1946, he also completed a one-year course in film, and began producing educational and documentary films at the Documentary Film Studio in Warsaw before moving on, in the ’50s, to the Educational Film Studio in Łódź. (Culture.Pl)

POCIAG (THE NIGHT TRAIN) -encore screening-
1959/100 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director/Writer:Jerzy Kawalerowicz, Cinematographer:Jan Laskowski

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Two strangers, Jerzy (Leon Niemczyk) and Marta (Lucyna Winnicka), accidentally end up holding tickets for the same sleeping chamber on an overnight train to the Baltic Sea coast. Also on board is Marta’s spurned lover, who will not leave her alone. When the police enter the train in search of a murderer on the lam, rumors fly and everything seems to point toward one of the main characters as the culprit. (wiki)

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Director: Jerzy Kawalerowicz
Film director and screenwriter. Born on the 19th of January 1922 in Gwozdziec (now Gvozdets in Ukraine), died on the 27th of December 2007 in Warsaw.Kawalerowicz’s first films were counted as part of neo-realism. This style served the director mainly to poeticise the uninteresting everyday reality he showed in his films. At the time, Kawalerowicz gained recognition as an excellent observer of reality, and a portraitist of authentic characters through sensitive visual imagery. Although Kawalerowicz made his films at the time of the “Polish school”, he remained outside its mainstream. The Polish school of filmmaking usually followed a national perspective – its great theme was the fate of the Poles.

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Kawalerowicz, meanwhile, chose universal themes. He is probably best known for his films Mother Joan of the Angels and Pharaoh, which reveal the director’s special and original style. Critic Konrad Eberhardt wrote about the director’s style in the Film weekly in 1996:The moonscape of Mother Joan of the Angels, the austere convent architecture, the white walls obsessively enclosing the characters (…) create a vision of a world made up of a huge number of road signs which have to be deciphered. (…) ‘Pharaoh’ was made along similar lines. Its picturesque beauty, its fascinatingly spectacular character, also were not meant to be the objective but a starting point, an invitation to penetrate areas of the subject matter which stretched above, or among the reality. Many of Kawalerowicz’s films are adaptations of literature, which has been processed into original works marked with the director’s creative individuality. Kawalerowicz has been called an epic author and a reconstructor of no longer existent worlds. Critic Zygmunt Kaluzynski wrote in the Polityka weekly in 2000:Mother Joan of the Angels’ was a reconstruction of the lost Middle Ages (though the plot is set in the 18th century, but in conditions mentally unchanged for centuries), ‘Pharaoh’ … is a reconstruction of Egyptian antiquity. And then ‘The Inn’ – a re-creation of the destroyed world of Hasidic Jewish culture. Despite the diversity of subjects, it is possible to discover a constant trend which is fundamental for his vision. This is a kind of deeply rooted and instinctive opposition to any unbridled individual and collective emotionality. That’s why this director stayed away from Romanticism. As Maria Kornatowska remarked, he is one of those people who prefer the “wise man’s looking glass and eye” to “feeling and faith”.

Andrzej Wajda Selections

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KANAL (THEY LOVED LIFE / ILS AIMAIENT LA VIE) -encore screening-
1957/96 min./B&W/Digital
Director:Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Jerzy Lipman

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A symbolic depiction of hell on Earth, set in the last days of the Warsaw uprising in 1944. Lieutenant Zadra is commanding a company of 43 men in a desperate battle amidst the ruins. Facing German offense and cut off from their comrades, Zadra is commanded to retreat his men through the sewer system (‘kanal’). Zadra and his men are reluctant to do so, as it would indicate that they have lost the battle, but decide to obey the orders. However, as the men (and women) retreat, it becomes clear that their desperate attempt to flee from the hell of battle will result only in more death and suffering…- By Heka A
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POPIOL I DIAMENT (ASHES AND THE DIAMOND) -encore screening-
1958/104 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director/Writer:Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Jerzy Wójcik

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During the German occupation noble, bourgeois and worker’s partisan groups lived in peace with another. On the first day of freedom they start to fight each other. Maciek and Andrzej (noble group) get the task of killing a communist leader (Szczuka). They have carefully chosen the place where Szczuka will soon come in a car. But another car with two innocent persons come a little earlier, and both are shot in the belief that one of them were Szczuka. They learn about their mistake when Szczuka and his co-worker check into a hotel. Maciek manages to get the room next to. It will turn out that Szczuka’s son is in a noble partisan group. – A very tender love story, one of the best ever made, develops between Maciek and the waitress Krystyna. This makes Maciek want a normal life. Andrzej is his superior but also his friend. They agree that Maciek alone will finish the Szczuka affair and then leave the partisan group. Andrzej will go to Warszawa to replace an officer who had just been killed. Maciek shoots Szczuka in the street. His shots are drowned by the midnight fireworks. But he knows that it would mean suicide to stay with Krystyna. The plot is not finished with their leave, which is particularly painful to her. – By Max Scharnberg, Stockholm, Sweden.

WSZYSTKO NA SPRZEDAZ (EVERYTHING FOR SALE)
1968/100 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Directo/Writer:Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Witold Sobocinski

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In a sense, this unique film is a tribute to the famous Polish actor, Zbigniew Cybulski, who died in a train accident two years ago. Although Cybulski’s name is never spoken upon the screen, we know that this film is about him and the legend woven around the boy in tinted glasses from Wajda’s Ashes and Diamonds – a representation of the “lost generation” of young Poles, who moved from adolescence into maturity during World War II. Although that film made both Wajda and Cybulski internationally-famous, they never worked together again. In Everything For Sale, a film is being made, and for some reason, the leading actor has not appeared. The sequence being shot involves a man who falls to his death while trying to leap upon a moving train. Exasperated, the Director decides to double for the missing actor, while the actor’s wife tries to find him. Soon, the director’S wife (who had formerly bee the mistress of the actor) joins the search. Perhaps out of annoyance and a growing sense of panic, the director abandons the script and starts maing a film about the actor’s life, and asks the two women to play themselves in the film.

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They agree, and places which were either visited by the actor or probably visited are photographed as locales. There are conversations filmed with people who had known him or who had met him for the first time. Then, a news broadcast announces the actor’s tragic death. The director is in despair but he does not give up the shooting of his film – a film about the absence of an actor. Another hero is sought, and young Daniel Obrychski is chosen. (This artist is in actuality the most popular young actor in Poland today and is often compared to Cybulski). The outcome of this fascinating film is just as entracing as its envolvement; Wadja has created a very personal, experimental work here, very Polish in mood and inventiveness. It is a haunting homage to the past, a story of elusive contours and shapes which have merely been outlined, now disappearing and dissolving into oblivion. – UC Berkley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Triggered by Zbigniew Cybulski’s tragic death in 1967 and inspired by Federico Fellini’s “film about a film” Eight and a Half, Wajda filmed Everything for Sale in 1968. The plot in which reality mixes with fiction is based on the circumstances of the filming of the movie: the film’s main character doesn’t come to the film set. The director shows the search for the missing actor. Everything for Sale is a bitter reflection about the situation of Polish public life at that time. Reveals the traces of Wajda’s artistic inspirations, it’s a reassessment of his artistic output and that of other contemporary Polish filmmakers. (Culture.Pl)

KRAJOBRAZ PO BITWIE (LANDSCAPE AFTER THE BATTLE)
1970/107 min./Color/Digitally Remastered
Director/Writer:Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Zygmunt Samosiuk

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Film opens with the mad rush of haphazard freedom as the concentration camps are liberated. Men are trying to grab food, change clothes, bury their tormentors they find alive. Then they are herded into other camps as the Allies try to devise policy to control the situation. A young poet who cannot quite find himself in this new situation, meets a headstrong Jewish young girl who wants him to run off with her, to the West. He cannot cope with her growing demands for affection, while still harboring the hatred for the Germans and disdain for his fellow men who quickly revert to petty enmities. By Polish Cinema Database

CZLOWIEK Z MARMURU (MAN OF MARBLE)
1977/160 min./Color/Digital
Director:Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Edward Klosinski

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In 1976, a young woman in Krakow is making her diploma film, looking behind the scenes at the life of a 1950s bricklayer, Birkut, who was briefly a proletariat hero, at how that heroism was created, and what became of him. She gets hold of outtakes and censored footage and interviews the man’s friends, ex-wife, and the filmmaker who made him a hero. A portrait of Birkut emerges: he believed in the workers’ revolution, in building housing for all, and his very virtues were his undoing. Her hard-driving style and the content of the film unnerve her supervisor, who kills the project with the excuse she’s over budget. Is there any way she can push the film to completion? By

CZLOWIEK Z ZELAZA (MAN OF IRON)
1981/152 min./Color/Digital
Director/Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Edward Klosinski

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Andrzej Wajda’s account of the events at the Gdansk shipyard in the summer of 1980. Winkiel (Marian Opania), a burned-out, alcoholic journalist is assigned to look into the activities of Maciek Tomzyk (Jerzy Radziwilowicz), the charismatic and articulate leader of striking shipyard workers. He turns out to be the son of Mateusz Birkut. The journalist makes use of her own reputation as a youthful radical, implying a solidarity with Tomzyk even as she searches for the dirty laundry the party bosses hope she’ll find. But as she interviews the labour leader’s associates and his detained wife, Agnieszka (Krystyna Janda), and hears of his travails and of his father’s death in the 1970 crackdown against the workers, Opania begins to feel his former idealism returning, forcing her to consider putting her own career at risk to side with the strikers. – By Mr Bongo

KORCZAK
1990/118 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director:Andrzej Wajda, Cinematographer:Robby Müller

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Account of the last days of life of the legendary Polish pedagogue Janusz Korczak and his heroic dedication to protecting Jewish orphans during the war. Jewish doctor Henryk Goldszmit, known also as Janusz Korczak, is a man of high principles. He is unafraid of shouting at German officers and frequently has to be persuaded to save his own life. His orphanage, set up in a cramped school in the Warsaw ghetto, provides shelter to 200 homeless kids. Putting his experimental educational methods into practice, he installs a kind of children’s self-government, whose justice is in a big contrast to what is happening in the outside world. Right in front of the school, dozens of kids are dying or being killed everyday and their naked bodies lie on the street unattended. Ghetto’s mayor assures Korczak that the orphanages will be saved. Korczak raises food and money for the orphanage from the rich Jews. In the final roundup he refuses to accept a Swiss passport and boards the train to Treblinka with his orphans. – By Polish Cinema Database

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Director:Andrzej Wajda
Born on the 6th of March 1926 in Suwa?ki, Poland. Film and theatre director, script writer and set designer, one of the world’s most renowned cinematographers and winner of an Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2000.

DO WIDZENIA, DO JUTRA -encore screening-
1960/87 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director:Janusz Morgenstern, Cinematographer:Jan Laskowski

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Jacek is a handsome, charming young Pole who belongs to a drama company.One day, in the streets of Gdansk, he meets Marguerite a beautiful, charming French girl, Marguerite. He falls for her but the young lady is whimsical…

ZEZOWATE SZCZESCIE (BAD LUCK) -encore screening-
1960/113 min./B&W/Digital
Director:Andrzej Munk, Cinematographer:Jerzy Lipman

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The story is an odyssey of a little man through Poland of 1930 to 1950. It shows his attempts to cope with a changing world which seems to have no place for him. He has no consciousness of any kind but is always on the verge of turning into a more coherent human being, only to be slapped down. It begins with the hero’s childhood. Then comes the first love marred by his unwilling involvement in fascict politics, him being taken for a Jew because of his nose. Later he decides to join the army to charm the girl, but arrives too late for any fighting. He is arrested by entering German troops while he dresses in officer’s uniform and mistakenly sent to POW camp as an officer. – By Polish Cinema Database

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Director:Andrzej Munk
Film director, script writer and cameraman. Born in 1921 in Krakow. Died tragically in 1961. While his documentaries shot under communist occupation until the mid-1950s were propaganda productions, his later feature films broke with the schematic formula and subtly pointed out the drawbacks of a politicised approach to labour. Having gained a reputation as a great documentary maker, he managed to create works that were inscribed into the socialist realism pattern but at the same time opposed it. Munk claimed that his films were “a response to the official tone of the documentaries of the time, to their laconic, over-optimistic tone. I tried to show issues that had been made banal, I wanted to show the hardship, sacrifice, heroism, beauty of everyday work”. Having played an unquestionably important role in Polish documentary filmmaking, Andrzej Munk the director of Eroica, Bad Luck and the unfinished Passenger, films which have entered the canons of Polish classics, next to Andrzej Wajda, was the main author of the restoration-oriented trend in Polish cinema dubbed the “Polish school”.

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Showing motifs of armed action and heroism requiring sacrifice in a de-mythologized way, the school emerged in the mid-1950’s out of the need to shed the burden of the socialist-realist model. Critics have commented that although a part of the anti-heroic trend of the Polish school, Munk’s works stood out because of their realistic tissue, with a tendency for quasi-documentary figures as opposed to Wajda’s ” epic poems” and the school’s tendency for lyricism. nti-Romantic role in the “Polish school”. He began his career directing films that followed the spirit of the times. Several of his documentaries such as Nauka bli?ej zycia / Science Closer to Life, or Kierunek Nowa Huta / Destination Nowa Huta, were used as propaganda material. Although critics argue that today it is difficult to notice the nuances that distinguish a film in compliance with the enforced pattern and one that breaks with it, according to film essayist Bozena Janicka, Andrzej Munk – and only he – grasped the vibration between official propaganda, which used methods imported from the east to encourage people to work hard, and the genuine commitment of the people, who would have done what they did even without the propaganda, declarations, campaigns, and dull speeches. Andrzej Munk knew that the imposed propaganda ritual could conceal the real truth about people who act out of a genuine, not forced sense of responsibility for themselves and others. This was an inconvenient conclusion at the time, as it questioned the grounds for the authorities’ sense of being the masters […]. (Culture.Pl)

NIKT NIE WOLA (NOBODY’S CALLING) -encore screening-
1960/83/B&W/Digitally remastered
Director: Kazimierz Kutz, Cinematographer:Jerzy Wójcik

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In 1960 Kazimierz Kutz’ second film NIKT NIE WOLA, based on a Jozef Hen novel that was never published in Poland, described the fate of Poles on the Eastern Front. Kutz used the film to explore new formal solutions, collaborating closely with cinematographer Jerzy Wojcik to reveal the psychological landscape of a pair of lovers who are strongly affected by wartime events. The camera recorded the couple’s inner experiences, contrasting their muted intimacy against the surrounding scenery of a ruined town. The film did not win over critics at the time of its release. It was not until later that critics recognized Kutz’s effort to experiment with aesthetics in a manner akin to that pursued by filmmakers of the new wave. NOBODY’S CALLING came to be compared with Michelangelo Antonioni’s THE ADVENTURE, which was produced around the same time.

REKOPIS ZNALEZIONY W SARAGOSSIE (THE SARAGOSSA MANUSCRIPT)
-encore screening-
1965/182 min./B&W/Digitally Remastered
Director:Wojciech Jerzy Has, Cinematographer:Mieczyslaw Jahoda

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In the Napoleonic wars, an officer finds an old book that relates his grandfather’s story, Alfons van Worden, captain in the Walloon guard. A man of honor and courage, he seeks the shortest route through the Sierra Morena. At an inn, the Venta Quemada, he sups with two Islamic princesses. They call him their cousin and seduce him; he wakes beside corpses under a gallows. He meets a hermit priest and a goatherd; each tells his story; he wakes again by the gallows. He’s rescued from the Inquisition, meets a cabalist and hears more stories within stories, usually of love. He returns to Venta Quemada, the women await with astonishing news. – By jhailey@hotmail.com>

IDA – FORMERLY SISTER OF MERCY -Japan Premiere-
2013/80 min./B&W/Digital
Director/Writer:Pawel Pawlikowski, Cinematographer:Lukasz Zal

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British-based filmmaker Pawel Pawlikowski has spent his entire career thus far outside, geographically at least, his native Poland. Now, with his five feature film, he journey’s back to rediscover his homeland along with his two lead characters in the beautiful Ida (2013). It’s a trip back in time to the sixties, shot in exquisite monochrome and telling a fairly intimate tale which can’t help but feel incredibly personal to its director, despite its bleak tone. With exceptional performances from Agata Kulesza and newcomer Agata Trzebuchowska, it could be a dark horse from the top prize at this year’s Lff. Ida starts out as Sister Ana (Trzebuchowska), an orphaned young nun about to take her vows in a small convent. Before she can, she is directed to leave her cloistered surroundings, and experience a little of the wider world by taking a trip to meet her only living relative, her aunt Wanda ≫ – CineVue UK

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Director:Pawel Pawlikowski
The director Pawel Pawlikowski shoots on treatment, allowing for cast input and on-set improvisation, and is regarded by the BBC as “one of Britain’s leading filmmakers”. His new hit Ida is currently taking over the world one prize at a time. Polish born, now living in Paris, he received an Emmy and the Prix Italia for his first documentary then took a BAFTA award for his feature debut.Pawlikowski was born in Warsaw in 1957 and left Poland at the age of 14. He is a “hybrid-filmmaker” who seems caught between realities. Journalists in Poland such as Bartek Staszczyszyn consider his “imagination and way of illustrating” to be closer to Western European traditions than the renowned Polish film school; writing for culture.pl, Staszczyszyn places Pawlikowski “closer to Lindsay Anderson and Francois Truffaut than to Andrzej Wajda or Krzysztof Zanussi”. And other reviewers spot in something distinctively Eastern European in his films.

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“His cinematic capital [is] bound up in the liturgy of Eastern Europe, particularly Russia”, Lars Kristensen writes in Mapping Pawel Pawlikowski and Last Resort. In an Arts Desk piece written by Nick Hasted, Pawlikowski says: “I could have become more British – I feel vaguely British. I’ve lived in Germany, Italy, my wife was Russian. […] So I seem to like being on the margin, in every way, even filming. Of course in cinema, which makes a lot of noise and is expensive, it’s tricky to be on the margins.” His experiences as a refugee seem to be incorporated in his films. Scenes from Last Resort in 2000 all the way to his latest feature, The Woman in the Fifth from 2011, show passports being handed over and people stopped at customs that, as Nick Hasted writes, “leaves the protagonists in a purgatory”. “Crossing borders with his parents as a child, Pawlikowski glimpsed that purgatory”, Hasted adds. “Some kind of Eastern European complex!” Pawlikowski recalls in the article “losing a passport once in Moscow. Once you lose it in certain parts of the world, your life will never be the same. When I first had a Western passport, it was such a weird feeling crossing borders. All of a sudden you don’t have to justify yourself, they have to treat you like a human being, you won’t be humiliated. Whereas if you lose this foreign passport, then you are at the mercy of whatever happens.

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The Russians have a phrase that means ‘anything goes’. No limits.” His films tackle difficult topics including war and deportation, with a dreamlike quality that makes them timeless and very “unBritish”. His best known documentary, Serbian Epics, took Pawlikowski and crew to the front lines of the siege of Sarajevo during the Bosnian civil war in 1994. As an account of the revival of Serbian oral poetry, the film achieves this timelessness through approaching the topic of the war indirectly. Last Resort, Pawlikowski’s first feature, is set in the British seaside town Margate, which houses “the mad and the bad, undeserving poor dumped by London councils all through the 1980s”, as well as asylum seekers. In The Guardian, Fiachra Gibbson writes that “Margate is portrayed as a bleak holding tank of a failed resort area. Looking out on to a dilapidated amusement park, the area is a virtual prison.” Pawlikowski was accused by local MPs of shedding a negative light on the town, but the director doesn’t consider his films to be social studies. “Last Resort was construed as a social document, an indictment of the asylum system – that’s how a lot of people saw it. But I was much more interested in what was going on between the heroine and her little boy than explaining the plight of refugees. I don’t want to make films about people on the margins of life, that’s too easy.” – he told Victoria Lindrea for the BBC.

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“Every good film is a bit like a dream, that’s what I usually aspire to, rather than some social document. I want to create a little world which will stay with the audience,” he told BBC’s Jen Foley. In Fiachra Gibbson’s piece, the Guardian writer says, Like its director, Last Resort is a very peculiar animal. It mixes gritty realism with a very un-British dreamlike quality which transcends the grimness of its setting. The handheld, documentary sequences of refugees huddled in shuffling queues for a solitary phonebox or the interior fug of greasy spoons are cut with beautiful, lingering wide-angle landscapes to create the eerie perspective of people who spend their days peering out uncomprehendingly at the strange country beyond their windows.

CHCE SIE ZYC (LIFE FEELS GOOD) -Japan Premiere-
2013/107 min./Color/Digital
Director/Writer: Maciej Pieprzyca, Cinematographer: Pawel Dyllus

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Helmer-scripter Pieprzyca places the character of Mateusz squarely at his story’s center. As a boy (Kamil Tkacz), Mateusz devises a unique method of moving around the apartment, lying on his back and flailing his arms to propel himself backward, which gives him a measure of autonomy. His happy childhood provides all kinds of education, from social instruction gained by watching neighbors from his window, to cosmic knowledge imparted by his whimsical wizard of a father (Arkadiusz Jakubik). While his mother (Dorota Kolak) wheels him around and showers him with kisses and laughter, his father fires his imagination. As he grows up, Mateusz (his role now undertaken by David Ogrodnik) even wins a loving girlfriend, the beautiful blonde next door (Anna Karczmarczyk). But, as with all his attempts to influence the world around him, his efforts to help her backfire: Momentarily freed of her abusive dad, she flees with Mom to parts unknown. Exit romance. But not sex. Once his father dies and his mother becomes unable to physically tend to him, Mateusz is uprooted and placed in a home for the mentally disabled, where only his undying interest in breasts keeps him sane. He devises a system to judge female caretakers by breast size, since they have little else going for them. Even more than at home, where his excitement at possibilities for communication were misread as hysteria and met with sympathetic quashing of his supposed “fits,” he is treated poorly in the asylum. Then Magda (Katarzyna Zawadzka), a beautiful new nurse, arrives and pays loving attention, dancing for him and waltzing with him in the wheelchair, the subjective camera turning in time to celebratory music. She even lets him touch her breasts; Mateusz feels vindicated. But comprehension does not always prove a blessing: When Magda takes him on an outing for her own neurotic needs, he understands her betrayal all too clearly. (Variety)

UWIKLANIE -Japan Premiere-
2011/123 min./Color/Digital
Director/Writer:Jacek Bromski, Cinematographer:Marcin Koszalka

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With a screenplay based on Zygmunt Miloszewski’s award winning detective novel, the movie portrays a seemingly routine investigation that turns into a fascinating intellectual game. The story builds around a Krakow public prosecutor in his thirties, who comes to unravel the mysterious death of a participant of the unconventional Hellinger group therapy session. During the course of family group therapy, the patients and therapist search for the family links of one of the patients. The others begin to behave – or rather to experience emotions – like members of his family. According to Hellinger, they not only inherit the physical characteristics of their ancestors, but their emotions: fear and frustration of former generations put a shadow on the behavior of today’s generation. Once these emotions are revealed in treatment, you can get rid of them – all that is needed is for the therapist to utter a key phrase at the right moment. (Culture.PL)

Bolek und Lolek (7 episodes) Animation
80 min./Color/Digital
Bolek and Lolek are two Polish cartoon characters from the TV animated series by the same title (Bolek i Lolek in Polish). They are based on Wladyslaw Nehrebecki’s sons, named Jan and Roman, and were partially created by German-born Alfred Ledwig before being developed by Wladyslaw Nehrebecki and Leszek Lorek. The series is about two young brothers and their fun and sometimes silly adventures which often involve spending a lot of time outdoors. They first appeared in an animated film in 1963. (Wikipedia)

Magic Pencil (seven episodes) Animation
62 min./Color/Digital
By Se-ma-for Studios / se-ma-for.com

http://www.polandfilmfes.com/

『ボーグマン』 アレックス・ファン・ヴァーメルダム Borgman ::Alex van Warmerdam -cinema

アレックス・ファン・ヴァーメルダム監督の『ボーグマン』 

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日常にさえ邪悪なものは現れると私は『ボーグマン』を通して見せたかった。時には普通の紳士や淑女の姿で、冷酷なまでにディテールに拘わりながら、邪悪なものは誇りや喜びを持って事を成す。悪の行われるのは冬の寒い夜だけでは無く、暖かく心地よい夏の太陽の下でも当然の如く行われる、そんな事を見せたかった。

常に捕らえ所の無いボーグマンのような存在が、欲望に屈しさせ、無力になるほど女性を夢中にさせる事ができるところを見せたかった。
私の他の映画に比べると『ボーグマン』の内容は暗い物だ。理由は一線を超えたかったからだが、想像力の暗い部分に降臨して、何があるか見極めてみたかった。誰にでも独自の解釈ができる、解答よりも質問が多く得られる映画を作りたかった。

『ボーグマン』はとても力強い映画だと思う。10年後にどのようにしてこの作品を書くに至ったか聞かれたらきっと忘れているだろう。物事には常に向上の余地があると私は信じている。この映画がどのように観客に受け入れられるかは気になるところだが、今は9本目の新作映画に取り掛かっている。

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並木道のある高級住宅地にボーグマンという男がやって来たことから、努力して築き上げた、裕福な家庭の夫婦や三人の子供達と子守に一連の奇妙な出来事が起こる。

森の中で獲物を追っている武装した神父と二人の男達。その獲物とは地面の下に掘った穴蔵で潜んでいる、伸び放題のヒゲをはやした、擦り傷だらけの男、ボーグマン。突然頭上から槍で突かれ、寸前のところで顔を擦れ、驚いて目を覚ます。ボーグマンは何とか追っ手から逃れて、他の隠れ家にいる仲間たちに忠告をする。彼らはそれぞれ違う方向へと逃げていく。

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高級住宅地の緑栄える通りを歩き抜けて行くボーグマン。大きなヴィラのベルを鳴らすと、扉を開く人妻に風呂に入れてくれと物乞いをするが、戸惑う事も無く人妻は扉を閉じる。

次のヴィラで若いテレビプロデユーサーのリチャードと出会うボーグマン。扉を閉じかける時に、妻のマリーナが過去に自分を看護してくれた事を明かす。嫉妬と怒りを抑えることができず、リチャードは無慈悲にも浮浪者を押し倒して、それを見てびっくりした妻を家の中へ押し戻す。気を失っているボーグマンは芝生の上で倒れているままだ。マリーナはボーグマンが怪我をしたと思い、家の中から出てきて看護しようとするが、既に彼はそこから消えている。

夫婦の子供達と家政婦が学校から一緒に戻ってくる。問題が起こり仕事場へと向かうリチャード。一晩中、気分を害していたマリーナだが、怪我をしたボルグマンが家の

中に隠れている事を知ると、リチャードには伝えずに浮浪者に風呂を浴びさせてやる。彼女は彼が休めるように、庭にあるサマーハウスを整える。家政婦が浮浪者の事に気づくと、マリーナは夫には内密にするようにと指示をする。

翌日リチャードはダイアのネックレスを妻に贈り、仲直りを試みる。子供の一人はマジシャンを見たと言い出すが、ボルグマンは家に居座る。
マリーナの素晴らしき潤った人生は崩れ始めてしまう。感情と現実は見知らぬ男の意のままにされ、夫が残酷な怪物になった夢を見る。

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二頭の犬が家の中を歩き回る。「お前たちが来るのはまだ早い。」と犬達を追い払うボーグマン。家の者が皆寝静まる頃、子供達に雲の上を舞う白い子供の話を話して聞かせる。

庭師を始末したボーグマンは太りの仲間を呼ぶ。「時は来た!」

『ホドロフスキーのDUNE』 JODOROWSKY’S DUNE

『ホドロフスキーのDUNE』

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『ホドロフスキーのDUNE』は驚くほど野心的でいて、不運な運命を辿る事になった、新時代を画するサイエンスフィクション「DUNE」の映画化を試みた、伝説的なカルト映画監督アレハンドロ・ホドロフスキーを描いた映画だ。

1974年、チリ出身の映画監督、アレハンドロ・ホドロフスキーは『エル・トポ』や『ホーリー・マウンテン』を発表し、人気深夜上映のムーブメントの先駆者となった。その成功に続き、最も野心的だと言えるプロジェクトに取り掛かる。オーソン・ウェルズやミック・ジャガー、デビッド・キャラダインやサルバドール・ダリという出演者と共に自分の12歳の息子のブロンティスも出演させていて、音楽はピンク・フロイドが演奏し、美術は 物議をかもす時代の先駆者、H・R・ギーガーやジャン・メビウス・ジローが手がけている。ホドロフスキーはフランク・ハーバートの古典的なサイエンスフィクション「DUNE」の映画化で、意気揚々と永遠にシネマの世界を変えようと試みた。

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「私にとって、「DUNE」は神が降りてくる事に匹敵する。神聖で、自由で、新たなパースペクティブを持つ何かを作りたかった。新しい思想を取り入れろ!」―アレハンドロ・ホドロフスキー

2年の間、ホドロフスキーと魂の戦士のチームは昼夜を問わず『DUNE』という素晴らしい世界の創造という膨大な作業に取り掛かり、3,000枚ものストーリーボードや、多くの絵画を描き、驚くべき衣装を考え出し、今までに無く感動的で説得力のある脚本を書き上げた。

「あの頃、映画を完成させる為にだったら片腕を切り落としても良かった。目的を達成する為になら死ぬつもりでいた。」―アレハンドロ・ホドロフスキー

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ホドロフスキーのプロデユーサー、ミシェル・セイドゥーの言葉を借りると「十分なはずだった。だがそうでは無かった。」
H・R・ギーガー(『エイリアン』のグラフィック・アーティスト)、ゲイリー・カーツ(『スター・ウォーズ』のプロデューサー)、ニコラス・ウィンディング・レフン(『ドライヴ』や『オンリー・ゴッド・フォーギヴズ』の映画監督)、この作品の監督、パビッチによって3年の期間を費やし撮影された、伝説的な存在や脚光を浴びる有名人などとのインタビューと、親密でいて誠実なホドロフスキーとの会話、さらには今まで公開される事の無かったホドロフスキーの圧倒的なサイケデリック・スペースオペラ(エミー賞にノミネートされたシド・ガロンによるアニメーション)が含まれている。公開される事の無かった最も偉大な映画が今この作品で語られる。
『ホドロフスキーのDUNE』はパビッチ監督の初の長編映画で2013年カンヌ映画祭の「監督週間」でプレミア上映された。

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ディレクターズ・ステートメント

アレハンドロ・ホドロフスキーの『DUNE』の製作に至る旅路の物語は、多くの理由で私を魅了していた。毎日のように沢山の映画が完成する前に消滅してしまう。通常そのような試みで残るのは脚本のドラフトや、出演の交渉をする為の、役者のイメージ・キャスティング・リストだけなのだが、この『ホドロフスキーのDUNE』のように、これほど完成に近づいていた映画は他には無いと言える。

『ホドロフスキーのDUNE』は創作力と想像力の世界へと誘う、驚くべき旅だった。絶え間無い夢の追求や芸術の必要性を語った映画だ。これは失敗の物語では無い。その逆で、これはネガティブなポテンシャルを大成功へと導いた、80歳になるアーティストの終わる事のないアイディアや推進力の進化の物語なのだ。

これはユニークな大志をテーマにした映画:芸術の力で世界を変えるという大きな大志。

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